Debating the Issues in Colonial Newspapers: Primary Documents on Events of the Period

By David A. Copeland | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 28
Separation from England,
1768-1776

With the Stamp Act crisis of 1765 (see Chapter 16), most Americans began thinking about the relationship between the American colonies and Great Britain. Americans protested that they were not directly represented in Parliament, and some concluded that the colonies should seriously consider a separation from Britain.

Charles Townshend, Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer (or finance), decided shortly after the Stamp Act's repeal in March 1766 that America's share of the British budget had to increase, as did America's ability to pay its own way as part of the British Empire. Townshend believed England had the right to tax the colonies directly or indirectly and discounted the arguments that had arisen during the Stamp Act concerning actual and virtual representation in America (see Chapter 17). Most members of Parliament concurred with Townshend and passed the Townshend Acts in June 1767, which levied a tax on imported tea, lead, paint, glass, and paper.

Most Americans reacted negatively to the Townshend Acts, but they soon discovered that there was little room for a redress of grievances politically for the new taxes because of the Declaratory Act, passed in 1765 on the heels of the Stamp Act and to a great extent ignored in America because of the Stamp Act furor. The Declaratory Act gave Parliament sole authority to make laws for the colonies, and it gave Parliament the right to dissolve colonial legislatures.

When the New York legislature reacted negatively to another of Britain's new policies, the Quartering Act, according to which troops could

-340-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Debating the Issues in Colonial Newspapers: Primary Documents on Events of the Period
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 397

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.