Space, Time, and Freedom: The Quest for Nationality and the Irrepressible Conflict, 1815-1861

By Major L. Wilson | Go to book overview

6
Free Soil and the Irrepressible Conflict

The expansion of slavery became the central issue in the national debate from the Mexican War to the outbreak of civil strife in 1861. It rapidly displaced the old debate between Whigs and Democrats over the expansion of the nation with the far more fateful conflict over which element within the nation would be entitled to expand. As they defined and forced the issue, Free Soilers saw it, not as a debate between two kinds of freedom, but rather an irrepressible conflict between freedom and slavery. "The momentous questions of liberty and slavery," Joshua R. Giddings of Ohio declared in the House, "are now before the people of the nation."1 Only through the events of the 1850s would the irrepressible conflict mature, but the basic terms of the conflict achieved full formulation in the bitter contest over the fate of territories likely to be acquired from Mexico.

In four related ways the outlines of this irrepressible conflict can be clearly discerned. The political context in which the debate emerged was of massive import, for it heralded the disruption of the old Jeffersonian coalition of planters and plain republicans which Martin Van Buren had revived under Jackson. And, as many feared, a sundered Jefferson tended to civil conflict. Secondly, the plain

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Space, Time, and Freedom: The Quest for Nationality and the Irrepressible Conflict, 1815-1861
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1- Liberty And Union 3
  • 2- The Missouri Controversy 22
  • 3- Time and The American System 49
  • 4- Nullification and The Emergence Of Jacksonian Democracy 73
  • 5- Manifest Destiny 94
  • 6- Free Soil and The Irrepressible Conflict 120
  • 7- The Crisis And Compromise of 1850 148
  • 8- Progress and The Irrepressible Conflict 178
  • 9- Seward and The Repressible Conflict 211
  • Notes 239
  • Index 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.