Brazilian Culture: An Introduction to the Study of Culture in Brazil

By Fernando de Azevedo; William Rex Crawford | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS AND BELIEFS

The history of the missions and the history of Christian civilization -- The Company of Jesus and the Reformation -- The first mission of the Jesuits to Brazil -- Catechism: José de Anchieta -- The gospel in the jungle -- The tempest of the Reformation and its repercussion in Brazil -- The foundation in Rome ( 1622) of a permanent Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith -- The expansion of missions -- The missionaries against the abuses of the conquest -- Antdnio Vieira in his struggle against the slavery of the Indians -- Culture in this period more or less the-tributary of religion-Catholicism and the influence of Afro-Indian religions -- The big house, the chapel and slave quarters -- Churches and temples -- The pulpit in Brazil -- The training of priests -- The orders and religious congregations -- Their wealth and their flourishing -- Masonry -- The activities of the masonic lodges -- The fusion of church and State -- The influence of the clergy -- The great preachers -- The religious question -- Freedom of worship and of belief -- Protestantism and its progress -- Spiritualism and other forms of religion -- Theosophy-Positivism -- The "religion of humanity" -- Religion and culture -- The dominance of the Catholic religion.

IT MAY SEEM STRANGE at first sight that when we approach the analysis of the culture in the more restricted sense, and in its fundamental aspects, we should begin by studying religious beliefs and institutions. Certainly, taking the term "culture" in its broadest significance, as it is common in the field of cultural anthropology, religious beliefs and institutions are an integral part of the spiritual culture of a people. Seen in this light, it would be one of the conditions and factors of culture in the more limited sense of intellectual, literary, artistic, or scientific development. But so intimate and constant are the relations between the development of religion in Brazil and that of intellectual life in our first three centuries, that one cannot for that long period separate one from the other. In that phase of our social formation, it was indeed out of religious aims, forms, and essentials that practically the whole culture was developed in this part of the continent. Religion had an influence in the colonial period that was without doubt preponderant and practically exclusive in the organization of the system of culture, which, as much in its content as in its forms and institutions, shows vividly those relations of close dependence between culture and religion. It is not only points of contact that were established between them, zones of influence and of interpenetration, but true bonds which tied them together from their beginning, interweaving their roots and obliging us to relate our cultural history to events, institutions, and influences in the field of religion. Tributary to religion, on whose sap it was nourished for a long time, culture only later, especially in the nineteenth century, became detached from the church, without ceasing to the Christian in its spirit and in its manifestations, in order to tie itself up with professional life and institutions designed for the preparation for the liberal professions. Thus, of ecclesiastical initiative and religious content at the beginning, growing up in the shade of convents, seminaries, and the colleges of the

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brazilian Culture: An Introduction to the Study of Culture in Brazil
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 562

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.