Mad Monkton and Other Stories

By Wilkie Collins; Norman Page | Go to book overview

THE DIARY OF ANNE RODWAY

MARCH 3rd, 1840. A long letter today from Robert, which surprised and vexed and fluttered me so, that I have been sadly behind-hand with my work ever since. He writes in worse spirits than last time, and absolutely declares that he is poorer even than when he went to America, and that he has made up his mind to come home to London. How happy I should be at this news, if he only returned to me a prosperous man! As it is, though I love him dearly, I cannot look forward to the meeting him again, disappointed and broken down and poorer than ever, without a feeling almost of dread for both of us. I was twenty-six last birthday and he was thirty-three; and there seems less chance now than ever of our being married. It is all I can do to keep myself by my needle; and his prospects, since he failed in the small stationery business three years ago, are worse, if possible, than mine. Not that I mind so much for myself; women, in all ways of life, and especially in my dress-making way, learn, I think, to be more patient than men. What I dread is Robert's despondency, and the hard struggle he will have in this cruel city to get his bread--let alone making money enough to marry me. So little as poor people want to set up in house-keeping and be happy together, it seems hard that they can't get it when they are honest and hearty, and willing to work. The clergyman said in his sermon, last Sunday evening, that all things were ordered for the best, and we are all put into the stations in life that are properest for us. I suppose he was right, being a very clever gentleman who fills the church to crowding; but I think I should have understood him better if I had not been very hungry at the time, in consequence of my own station in life being nothing but Plain Needlewoman.

March 4th. Mary Mallinson came down to my room to take a cup of tea with me. I read her bits of Robert's letter, to show her that if she has her troubles, I have mine too; but I could not succeed in cheering her. She says she is born to

-129-

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Mad Monkton and Other Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics Mad Monkton And Other Stories i
  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxxi
  • Select Bibliography xxxii
  • A Chronology of Wilkie Collins xxxiv
  • A Terribly Strange Bed 1
  • A Stolen Letter 21
  • Mad Monkton 39
  • The Ostler 105
  • The Diary of Anne Rodway 129
  • The Lady of Glenwith Grange 165
  • The Dead Hand 195
  • The Biter Bit 217
  • John Jago's Ghost 248
  • The Clergyman's Confession 307
  • The Captain's Last Love 333
  • Who Killed Zebedee? A First Word for Myself 355
  • Explanatory Notes 379
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