Domesticity with a Difference: The Nonfiction of Catharine Beecher, Sarah J. Hale, Fanny Fern, and Margaret Fuller

By Nicole Tonkovich | Go to book overview

Index
Abolition, 147
Abuse, domestic, 194, 195
Acton, Eliza, 107
Adams, Abigail, 81
Adams Female Academy, 40
Adams, John Quincy, 110
Administration, 150-51, 161; educational, 154; professionalization of, 153, 154, 169
Administrators, women as, 154-56, 160-68, 170
Adoption, 183, 197, 201
Advice writing, xv, 22, 77, 91, 92, 96, 101, 129, 132, 136, 143. See also Conduct books
Alcott, Bronson, 24
Alden, Sarah, 125
American Dictionary of the English Language, 112
American identity, 32, 80, 98, 99, 128, 130, 131, 132, 190; created in advice books, 93, 98, 99, 103, 106; differentiated from European, 93, 103. See also Nationalism
American Women's Educational Association (AWEA), 101
Anglo-Saxon, 93, 99, 102, 105
Anonymity, 12, 31, 48, 49, 50, 51, 190
Armstrong, Nancy, 204 n 1
Associationism, 188, 197
Atlantic Monthly, 36, 198
Attire. See Dress
Aunty Jones, 4, 7
Authors, 92, 128, 129-33, 134; as omniscient, 134, 146-47; as rationalizing domesticity, 142, 143; and servants, 129, 134, 141, 142, 146; women as, 128, 129, 132, 134, 146-47
Autobiography. See Life writing
Autodidacticism, 113, 115, 118, 120, 157
Bacon, Delia, 198
Bancroft, George, 49, 50
Barker, Anna, 177, 185
Barton, Cyrus, 30
Baym, Nina, 205 n 4
Beecher, Catharine, 52, 54, 58, 59, 76, 82, 88, 121, 135, 148, 149, 152, 154, 160, 161, 166, 174, 178, 180, 192; advice to servants, 141, 143-44; and AWEA, 101; biography, 3-14; and Catholicism, 181-82; and consociate families, 183, 200; and cookbook, 58; enrollment at Cornell, 148-49, 150, 169; and dress reform, 82, 88-90, 102; Hartford Female Seminary, 27, 160-68; and hysteria, 132-33, 207n 4; at Litchfield Female Academy, 9, 10; passing as servant, 76, 77; and reform of educational administration, 149, 154, 160-61; and same-sex affections, 174-75, 178, 179; and social class, 93, 96, 103; and suffragism, 200; as teacher, 149-54; and water cure, 180-81
WORKS: American Woman's Home, 89, 100, 137, 182, 200, 202; "An Address Written for the Young Ladies of Miss Beecher's School," 160; An Appeal to the People on Behalf of Their Rights as Authorized Interpreters of the Bible, 57; An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism with Reference to the Duty of American Females, 57; "Autobiography for the Entertainment of Family Friends," 4; Biographical Remains of Rev. George Beecher, 13; Domestic Receipt-Book, 100; Duty of American Women to Their Country, 3, 49, 169; Educational Reminiscences and Suggestions, 162, 179; "Essay on the Education of Female Teachers," 163; Letters to Persons Who Are Engaged in Domestic Service, 77, 100, 143, 144, 146; Letters to the People on Health and Happiness, 102, 104, 167, 168; Letters to the People on the Difficulties of Religion, 202; Miss Beecher's Domestic Receipt Book, 103, 107; Miss Beecher's Housekeeper and Healthkeeper, 57, 104, 141; New Housekeeper's Manual, 144; Principles

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