Jews in the South

By Leonard Dinnerstein; Mary Dale Palsson | Go to book overview

The Twentieth Century and the Jews

Lucian Lamar Knight

THE INDEBTEDNESS of human society to the Hebrew race is by no means restricted to the creedal doctrines of the revealed religion. If the sheer truth must be told in Gath this inventory alone is sufficient to exhaust the assets and to mortgage the affections of the whole civilized world for all time to come. For it makes the Gentile debtor to the Israelite for larger supplies of richer manna than the Israelite himself ever gathered in the wilderness.

But the history of ancient Palestine contains only the first installment of the obligation. Besides autographing, transcribing and preserving the sacred Scriptures, under divine inspiration, furnishing the theater for the Biblical events and supplying the ancestral homesteads from which Judaism, Christianity and Mohammedanism have emerged, the Jews have galvanized the secular activities of all the four continents, set the pace for human progress in all the diversified arts and industries and multiplied the achievements of Joseph the Hebrew upon an hundred Egyptian thrones.

Whenever an extravagant statement is made or an ignorant opinion is entertained it is only necessary to address the custodian of the records in the primal command of the old Pentateuch: "Let there be light." To establish the truth of the proposition laid down, there files into the courtroom a host of dignified witnesses, each of which represents a sphere of activity whose belt is an equator. The world of politics presents Benjamin Disraeli, the Earl of Beaconfield. The world of finance names Baron de Rothschild. The world of literature cites Israel Zang

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