The Masters of Capital: A Chronicle of Wall Street

By John Moody | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE IRONMASTERS

ANDREW CARNEGIE came to America with his father, mother, and brother in 1848, when he was thirteen years old. His parents were utterly penniless. They gravitated to Allegheny, where the father secured work in a cotton mill, and young Andy became a bobbin boy at one dollar and twenty cents a week. His mother helped out by taking in washing and binding boots for a shoemaker named Phipps, who had a small shop near by. This shoemaker had a ten-year-old son called Harry, and there it was that the two small boys, Henry Phipps and Andrew Carnegie, laid the foundations of their long friendship.

Andy worked as bobbin boy for a year, then became a stoker, and finally, at fifteen, he secured a job as a telegraph messenger boy at three dollars a week. He soon learned how to send and receive messages, often practising with other boys before

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The Masters of Capital: A Chronicle of Wall Street
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Chapter I - The Rise of the House of Morgan 1
  • Chapter II - Morgan and the Railroads 19
  • Chapter III - The Ironmasters 35
  • Chapter IV - Standard Oil and Wall Street 52
  • Chapter V - The Steel Trust Merger 70
  • Chapter VI - Harriman and Hill 89
  • Chapter VII - The Apex of "High Finance" 109
  • Chapter VIII - The Panic of 1907 and After 134
  • Chapter IX - Wall Street and the World War 155
  • Appendix 181
  • Bibliographical Note 221
  • Index 225
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