Men, Management, and Mental Health

By Harry Levinson; Charlton R. Price et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
RECIPROCATION

O NE afternoon a researcher and a general foreman were riding in the latter's truck outside of town. There were large black thunder clouds in the west. At 5:30 p.m., the storm hit. The rain came down in sheets -- so hard that the windshield wipers could not keep up and the truck slowed down to a crawl. Calls began to come from the general foreman's office on the two-way radio. The researcher made this chronology of succeeding events as they occurred:

5:35: A call comes that a transformer has blown on the south side of town.
5:45: A line is down on Sussex Street and a hot wire is in the alley. The general foreman and researcher go to check it.
5:45: General foreman calls in for a crew to cut the switch on the line which is hot so that it can be put up again.
5:50: General foreman and researcher return to warehouse. A substation reports it has no power. The superintendent is in the warehouse office. A line foreman comes in. A service truck goes out to open the switches on the 100 block of Sullivan. A radio station reports a tornado on the ground west of town.
6:05: A second truck leaves to repair lines in the south part of town. The general foreman has taken over the radio and telephones in the office. The superintendent sits down in a chair beside the general foreman's desk...The general foreman talks on the radio, does all the dispatching. The superintendent sits by.
6:10: A highway patrolman reports a funnel sighted five miles south of his position. The radio station reports the funnel heading for the town.
6:15: The town siren sounds. The superintendent suggests that managers in outlying communities should be alerted. He places a call to them. Another report comes in that a 12-kv line south of town to the rural customers is out of service.

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Men, Management, and Mental Health
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xv
  • Chapter I - Midland 1
  • Chapter II - Approach 13
  • Chapter III - The Unwritten Contract 22
  • Chapter IV - Interdependence 39
  • Chapter V - Distance 57
  • Chapter VI - Change 80
  • Chapter VII - The Other Sixteen Hours 106
  • Chapter VIII - Reciprocation 122
  • Chapter IX - The Resolution of Organizational Conflict 144
  • Chapter X - Toward Action 157
  • Appendix I - Research Team Operations 173
  • Appendix II - Announcement of the Midland Study in Employee Publication We Are the Learners 183
  • Appendix III - Oral Report to Midland Employees 187
  • References 198
  • Index 200
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.