PART TWO
THERE IS NO TRUTH OUT THERE

In the first section it was argued that Natural Theology fails to establish reference to God and so, likewise, does Reformed Epistemology. The only rational alternative seems to be anti-realism which has considerable explanatory power and which avoids the need for a claim to reference while still maintaining truth claims, albeit within different forms of life. The idea of truth being relative to different forms of life seems to be supported by constructivism in psychology. In both cases, therefore, truth is relative to the human community. In this section, this analysis will be extended and it will be argued that a divide in the road after Immanuel Kant has led to a widespread present view of the meaninglessness of life and the search for truth being seen as folly. Post-modernism, in different forms, has value and has revealed important insights but, in some versions, it has undermined confidence in crucial areas of human life. This represents a primary challenge both to education and to the way human beings see themselves.

-63-

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What Is Truth?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • New College Lectures and Publications V
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Dedication and Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One - What is Truth? 1
  • 1 - The Implications of a Denial of Truth--Or the Claim to Have It 3
  • 2 - Realism and Anti-Realism 12
  • 3 - Foundations Without Indubitability 29
  • 4 - Anti-Realism in Religion and Morality 38
  • 5 - Constructivism in Psychology 49
  • Part Two - There is No Truth Out There 63
  • 7 - Ontology and Epistemology 65
  • 8 - Hegel and Marx 74
  • 9 - Nietzsche and Ivan Karamazov 79
  • 10 - The Denial of a Real World 89
  • 11 - Post-Modernism 95
  • 12 - Post-Modernism and Self-Identity 105
  • 13 - Interim Conclusion 117
  • Part Three - The Centre Can Hold 121
  • 14 - The Path to Truth 123
  • 15 - The Kotzker 126
  • 16 - Soren Kierkegaard and Subjectivity 132
  • 17 - Wittgenstein and Perspicuity 141
  • 18 - The Sufis 151
  • 19 - Vaclav Havel and Living the Truth 156
  • 20 - Fear and Freedom 164
  • 21 - Bringing the Threads Together 182
  • Notes 190
  • Index 201
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