Women for a Change: A Grassroots Guide to Activism and Politics

By Thalia Zepatos; Elizabeth Kaufman | Go to book overview

I became very involved in politics, and started volunteering on campaigns. I got hooked on politics -- I think it's the most exciting and fun thing that I do. I've been appointed to three separate boards by three different governors, but I've never had the desire to be an elected official, because I think getting people there is a lot more important than being there myself. I really like helping people put together a viable campaign and then making them stick to some of those campaign promises -- I feel that's the most important part of my political work.

I can remember working actively on one political campaign, and yet when they were asking for money, no one ever asked me. Some people think that women never donate money, but that's a lie. Before, there was no expectation of women giving money, but that's changing quickly.

I've learned to start giving 'till it hurts. During the political season, I don't buy new clothes, I don't go out to dinner. I make major commitments to women candidates because I know how important it is.

I think EMILY's List is right on target. They're convincing women to give, to give more, and give consistently. They pick really solid candidates that meet their basic criteria, so you can trust their choices. When I see a candidate is backed by EMILY's List, I'm willing to put money into the campaign.

I used to write a check for $25, because it was easy. Now that same $25 check is always $100, and that's not so easy, but that's almost become a minimum for me. Not because I have so much more to give, but because it's so very important. I'm willing to do it because I know there's another woman who wants to and can't. And we've got to show that women can be a credible group of donors.

I've been in EMILY's List for several years, and I send the annual membership and contribute to three or four campaigns per year. I start at home first, with local races, and then I read the information they send and write checks to women in other states.

I supported Patty Murray, Jolene Unsoeld, I gave money to Carole Moseley- Braun and to Lynn Yeakel. I met Barbara Boxer a number of times and gave her money. I don't just support candidates from my own state because the issues are bigger than any one state. And getting women elected in more and more races helps us all.

I know that nearly $200,000 came into my state alone from women all around the country. So I would be really negligent if I didn't send checks out, too. In order to make the whole thing work, we have to send money out around the country.

My standard donation in a Congressional race is $1,000 in the primary and $1,000 in the general election. I know it sounds crazy, but this year I will give away about 15% of my income. It's a lot, but I feel I'm not really making a sacrifice if it doesn't mean anything to me. Sometimes I write checks, and then say, boy, I hope I can make all my other commitments.

There are times I drag myself out to one of these perfunctory political events, and once I get there I think, you know I really like these people!

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women for a Change: A Grassroots Guide to Activism and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.