The Romance of the Forest

By Ann Radcliffe; Chloe Chard | Go to book overview

THE ROMANCE
OF THE FOREST

VOLUME I

CHAPTER I

I am a man, So weary with disasters, tugg'd with fortune, That I would set my life on any chance, To mend it, or be rid on't.*

'WHEN once sordid interest seizes on the heart, it freezes up the source of every warm and liberal feeling; it is an enemy alike to virtue and to taste--this it perverts, and that it annihilates. The time may come, my friend, when death shall dissolve the sinews of avarice, and justice be permitted to resume her rights.'

Such were the words of the Advocate Nemours* to Pierre de la Motte,* as the latter stept at midnight into the carriage which was to bear him far from Paris, from his creditors and the persecution of the laws. De la Motte thanked him for this last instance of his kindness; the assistance he had given him in escape; and, when the carriage drove away, uttered a sad adieu! The gloom of the hour, and the peculiar emergency of his circumstances, sunk him in silent reverie.

Whoever has read Guyot de Pitaval, the most faithful of those writers who record the proceedings in the Parliamentary Courts of Paris, during the seventeenth century,* must surely remember the striking story of Pierre de la Motte, and the Marquis Phillipe de Montalt: let all such, therefore, be

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The Romance of the Forest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Romance of the Forest i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxv
  • Select Bibliography xxvi
  • A Chronology of Ann Radcliffe xxix
  • Advertisement ii
  • Volume I 1
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 33
  • Chapter III 44
  • Chapter III 59
  • Chapter III 97
  • Volume II 111
  • Chapter X 137
  • Chapter XII 172
  • Chapter XIII 205
  • Volume III 224
  • Chapter XVI 240
  • Chapter XVIII 271
  • Chapter XIX 293
  • Chapter XX 307
  • Chapter XXI 315
  • Chapter XXII 332
  • Chapter XXIII 335
  • Chapter XXIII 345
  • Chapter XXIII 351
  • Explanatory Notes 364
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