The Romance of the Forest

By Ann Radcliffe; Chloe Chard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII

'And Hope enchanted smil'd, and wav'd her golden hair; And longer had she sung--but with a frown, Revenge impatient rose.'

ODE TO THE PASSIONS*

THE dawn of morning now trembled through the clouds,* when the travellers stopped at a small town to change horses. Theodore entreated Adeline to alight and take some refreshment, and to this she at length consented. But the people of the inn were not yet up, and it was some time before the knocking and roaring of the postillion could rouse them.

Having taken some slight refreshment, Theodore and Adeline returned to the carriage. The only subject upon which Theodore could have spoke with interest, delicacy forbade him at this time to notice; and after pointing out some beautiful scenery on the road, and making other efforts to support a conversation, he relapsed into silence. His mind, though still anxious, was now relieved from the apprehension that had long oppressed it. When he first saw Adeline, her loveliness made a deep impression on his heart: there was a sentiment in her beauty, which his mind immediately acknowledged, and the effect of which, her manners and conversation had afterwards confirmed. Her charms appeared to him like those since so finely described by an English poet:

'Oh! have you seen, bath'd in the morning dew,
The budding rose its infant bloom display;
When first its virgin tints unfold to view,
It shrinks and scarcely trusts the blaze of day?

So soft, so delicate, so sweet she came,
Youth's damask glow just dawning on her cheek.
I gaz'd, I sigh'd, I caught the tender flame,
Felt the fond pang, and droop'd with passion weak.'*

A knowledge of her destitute condition, and of the dangers with which she was environed, had awakened in his heart the tenderest touch of pity, and assisted the change of admiration

-172-

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The Romance of the Forest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Romance of the Forest i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxv
  • Select Bibliography xxvi
  • A Chronology of Ann Radcliffe xxix
  • Advertisement ii
  • Volume I 1
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 33
  • Chapter III 44
  • Chapter III 59
  • Chapter III 97
  • Volume II 111
  • Chapter X 137
  • Chapter XII 172
  • Chapter XIII 205
  • Volume III 224
  • Chapter XVI 240
  • Chapter XVIII 271
  • Chapter XIX 293
  • Chapter XX 307
  • Chapter XXI 315
  • Chapter XXII 332
  • Chapter XXIII 335
  • Chapter XXIII 345
  • Chapter XXIII 351
  • Explanatory Notes 364
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