A Game at Chesse

By Thomas Middleton; R. C. Bald | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A

DOCUMENTS RELATING TO "A GAME
AT CHESSE"

1.

"A new play called A Game at Chess, written by Middleton" was licensed by Sir Henry Herbert, June 12, 1624.

So his Office Book MS.1

[MS. note by Malone in his copy of quarto III in the Bodleian Library ( Mal.247).]


2.

GEORGE LOWEto SIR ARTHUR INGRAMat YORK

1624, Aug. 7. London. . . . There is a new play called the Game at Chess ("Chestes") acted yesterday and to-day, which describes Gondomar and all the Spanish proceedings very boldly and broadly, so that it is thought that it will be called in and the parties punished.

[ Historical MSS. Commission, Report on MSS. in Various Collections, vol. VII: The MSS. of the Hon. Frederick Lindley Wood, p. 27.]


3.

MR SECRETARY CONWAYto the PRIVY COUNCIL

May it please your LLps --

His Matie hath receaued informac+̅on from the Spanish Ambassador, of a very scandalous Comedie acted publickly by the King's Players, wherein they take the boldnes, and p+̅sumption in a rude, and dishonorable fashion, to represent on the Stage the persons of his Matie, the King of Spaine, the Conde de Gondomar, the Bishop of Spalato &c. His Matie remembers well there was a commaundment and restraint giuen against the rep+̅sentinge of anie modern Christian kings in those Stage-plays, and wonders much both at the boldnes

____________________
1
Fleay ( Hist. of the Stage, p. 268) seems to indicate that the "play called The Spanishe Viceroy," mentioned in the letter of submission from the King's Men to Herbert on December 20, 1624 (see Variorum Shakespeare, vol. III, pp. 209-10), is to be identified with A Game at Chesse. But, as it is specifically stated in the letter that that play was acted "not being licensed under your worship's hande," this is impossible. Cf. no. 10 below.

-159-

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A Game at Chesse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Addendum xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • A Game at Chesse 45
  • Textual Notes 121
  • Notes 137
  • Appendix A 159
  • Appendix B 167
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