The Separation of Church & State Defended: Selected Writings of James E. Wood, Jr.

By Derek H. Davis; James E. Wood Jr. | Go to book overview

Parochiaid and the U.S. Supreme Court

From almost any perspective the rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court on 28 June 1971, in Lemon v. Kurtzman and Earley v. DiCenso, must be viewed as landmark decisions in American church-state relations. In both cases the Court ruled against a state's "purchasing secular services" of parochial schools. As the New York Times astutely observed, "The decision on direct aid to parochial schools, which invalidated state laws in Rhode Island and Pennsylvania, marked the first time that the Supreme Court had struck down a law on aid to church schools." The General Secretary of the U. S. Catholic Conference, Bishop Joseph L. Bernadin, declared, "The serious impact of this decision on nonpublic schools cannot be overestimated.""In its impact," Time opined, " Lemon is likely to be surpassed only by the Court's historic decisions on racial desegregation." These historic decisions on public aid to parochial schools came on the last scheduled day of the Court's term, and were the last decisions in which the late Justices Hugo L. Black and John M. Harlan participated.

At the same time as these two decisions, in a Connecticut college aid case, Tilton v. Richardson, the Court gave qualified approval to the Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963, under which $240 million in federal funds had been provided for the construction of such college facilities as libraries, laboratories, and gymnasiums on campuses of public, private, and church colleges. The Court struck down, however, one feature of the law-that after twenty years the colleges could use the buildings for any purposes, including religious ones. Unlike Lemon v. Kurtzman and Farley v. DiCenso, Tilton v. Richardson was clearly a split decision, 5 to 4, with a majority decision but without a majority opinion.

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Separation of Church & State Defended: Selected Writings of James E. Wood, Jr.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 376

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.