Shakespeare and Voltaire

By Thomas R. Lounsbury | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
THE VOLTAIRE-WALPOLE CORRESPONDENCE

FROM the blow which the criticism of Kames had inflicted upon his vanity, Voltaire never entirely recovered. A little later he had the opportunity of observing another example of the perversity of the countrymen of Addison, in a quarter where once he would have least expected to find it. He could gather from it additional evidence which went to show that the fanaticism of the English in their worship of the monstrous creations of their favorite dramatist had now taken complete possession of all classes. That select company of superior beings in which he had found many sympathizers during his residence in England, was giving every indication of disappearing as a recognizable body. It had always been limited in influence; it was now becoming limited in numbers. Its views lingered in a languishing way in the critical literature of the time. But rarely was it the case that they were proclaimed in the self-assured tone which had formerly characterized their utterance. How far this blind admiration of Shakespeare was extending was brought home to Voltaire by a correspondence -- it is hardly proper to call it a controversy -- which in 1768 he carried on with Horace Walpole. The challenge he offered was declined with insincerities as flattering as any which he himself had ever used. There was an

-258-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and Voltaire
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 463

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.