The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview
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John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-): Economist and ambassador to India under President Kennedy

Wealth is not without its advantages and the case to the contrary, although it has often been made, has never proved widely persuasive.

( The Affluent Society, 1958)

The urge to consume is fathered by the value system which emphasizes the ability of the society to produce.

(Ibid.)

More die in the United States of too much food than of too little.

(Ibid.)

Politics is not the art of the possible. It consists in choosing between the disastrous and the unpalatable.

( Ambassador's Journal, 1969)

Augustus P. Gardner (1865-1918): Congressman from Massachusetts

Wake up, America.

(Speech in Congress, 16 October 1916)

James A. Garfield (1831-1881): Twentieth president

You and I know that teaching is not the work in which a man can live and grow.

(To a friend while teaching at Hiram College, 1859)

Fellow citizens! God reigns, and the government at Washington still lives.

(Speech in New York upon the death of Lincoln, 15 April 1865)

A pine bench, with Mark Hopkins at one end of it and me at the other, is a good enough college for me!

(Speech, 1871)

All free governments are party-governments.

(Speech in the House of Representatives, 18 January 1878)

-117-

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