The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview

H

Thomas J. Hagerty (1862?-1920): Catholic priest and labor organizer

The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people and the few, who make up the employing class, have all the good things of life.

( Preamble to the Constitution of the Industrial Workers of the World, June 1905)

Frank Hague (1876-1956): Political boss of Jersey City

You hear about constitutional rights, free speech, and the free press. Every time I hear these words I say to myself, "That man is a Red, that man is a Communist." You never hear a real American talk like that.

( Speech in Jersey City, 12 January 1938)

Alexander Haig (1924-): General and secretary of state under President Reagan

There are worse things than war.

(Testimony during his confirmation hearings before the Senate, 12 January 1981)

Mistakes were made, but I didn't make them. I wasn't there when they were made. I inherited them. I never willingly, consciously or unconsciously participated in any actions that I considered wrong, immoral, or illegal.

(Ibid., 13 January 1981, on his role as chief of the White House staff during President Nixon's Watergate scandal)

-131-

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The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 7
  • Preface 9
  • A 17
  • B 30
  • C 59
  • D 83
  • E 97
  • F 105
  • G 117
  • H 131
  • I 151
  • J 153
  • L 180
  • M 200
  • N 220
  • O 225
  • P 227
  • Q 238
  • R 238
  • S 260
  • T 280
  • V 297
  • W 300
  • X 327
  • Y 329
  • Z 330
  • A Grab Bag of Slogans And Catch Phrases 331
  • Index of Persons Quoted 337
  • Index of Subjects 345
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