The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview

I do not dislike your Bank any more than all banks. But ever since I read the history of the South Sea Bubble I have been afraid of banks.

( In conversation with Nicholas Biddle, 1829)

Our Federal Union: it must be preserved.

( Toast at Jefferson birthday celebration, in defiance of the nullifier, John C. Calhoun, 13 April 1830)

Humanity has often wept over the fate of the aborigines of this country, and Philanthropy has been busily employed in devising means to avert it, but its progress has never for a moment been arrested, and one by one have many powerful tribes disappeared from the earth. To follow to the tomb the last of his race and to tread on the graves of extinct nations excites melancholy reflections. But true philanthropy reconciles the mind to these vicissitudes as it does to the extinction of one generation to make room for another.

( Second annual address, 1830)

The bank, Mr. Van Buren, is trying to kill me, but I will kill it.

( To Martin Van Buren, 1832)

There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses.

( Veto of the Bank Bill, 10 July 1832)

Every man is equally entitled to protection by law; but when the laws undertake to add...artificial distinctions, to grant titles, gratuities, and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful, the humble members of society -- the farmers, mechanics, and laborers -- who have neither the time nor the means of securing like favors to themselves, have a right to complain of the injustice of their government.

(Ibid.)

The wisdom of man never yet contrived a system of taxation that would operate with perfect equality.

( Proclamation to the people of South Carolina, 10 December 1832)

I consider, then, the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, incompatible with the existence of the

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