The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview

Thomas Paine (1737-1809): American revolutionary agitator and writer

From the east to the west blow the
trumpet to arms!
Through the land let the sound of it
flee;
Let the far and the near all unite, with
a cheer,
In defense of our Liberty Tree.

( The Liberty Tree, July 1775)

A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.

( Common Sense, 1776)

A French bastard landing with an armed banditti and establishing himself King of England against the consent of the natives is, in plain terms, a very paltry rascally original.... The plain truth is that the antiquity of English monarchy will not bear looking into.

(Ibid.)

O! ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the Old World is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her as a stranger and England hath given her warning to depart. O! receive the fugitive and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.

(Ibid.)

Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.

(Ibid.)

No nation ought to be without a debt. A national debt is a national bond; and when it bears no interest, is in no case a grievance.

(Ibid.)

When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.

(Ibid.)

-227-

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The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 7
  • Preface 9
  • A 17
  • B 30
  • C 59
  • D 83
  • E 97
  • F 105
  • G 117
  • H 131
  • I 151
  • J 153
  • L 180
  • M 200
  • N 220
  • O 225
  • P 227
  • Q 238
  • R 238
  • S 260
  • T 280
  • V 297
  • W 300
  • X 327
  • Y 329
  • Z 330
  • A Grab Bag of Slogans And Catch Phrases 331
  • Index of Persons Quoted 337
  • Index of Subjects 345
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