Notre-Dame de Paris

By Victor Hugo ; Alban Krailsheimer | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF VICTOR HUGO
1802 26 February: born at Besançon.
1822 Marries Adèle Foucher.
1823 Publication of first novel, Han d'Islande. Publishes review of Scott's Quentin Durward, translated into French soon after first publication in English.
1824 Publication of ode 'La bande noire' against vandalism in general.
1825 Attends coronation of Charles X at Reims; on the way deplores ruinous state of cathedral and abbey at Soissons.
1826 Publication of novel Bug-Jargal and of collection Odes et ballades.
1827 Publication of unactable play Cromwell, with its long preface, a stirring manifesto of Romanticism.
1828 Contract with Gosselin for Notre-Dame.
1829 Publication of Les Orientales, followed by Dernier jour d'un condamné.
1830 February: first night of Hernani provokes a riot in the theatre. 25 July: work finally begins on NotreDame, interrupted almost at once by July Revolution (27-9 July), which sends Charles X into exile, and by the birth of a daughter (28 July). In full production by September.
1831 16 March: publication of Notre-Dame (less the eventual Book Five).
1832 March: publishes article 'Guerre aux démolisseurs!' November: Le Roi s'amuse banned as seditious after one performance (finally performed 1882). December: definitive edition of NotreDame published by Renduel.
1835 January: appointed to eight-man committee on monuments set up by the government.
1836 November: La Esmeralda performed at Paris Opéra, with libretto by Hugo and music by Louise Bertin.
1838 Appointed to new sixteen-man committee on monuments and arts, together with Prosper Mérimée and Montalembert, and remains a very active member until 1848. The preservation of the Hôtel

-xxviii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Notre-Dame de Paris
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Notre-Dame De Paris i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxvii
  • A Chronology of Victor Hugo xxviii
  • Table of Contents 3
  • Note to the First Edition 7
  • Book One 13
  • I The Great Hall 13
  • II Pierre Gringoire 28
  • III Monsieur Le Cardinal 38
  • IV Maître Jacques Coppenole 45
  • V Quasimodo 54
  • VI La Esmeralda 61
  • Book Two 65
  • II The Place de Grève 68
  • III Besos Para Golpes⋆ 71
  • IV The Disadvantages of Following a Pretty Woman Through the Streets at Night 81
  • V The Disadvantages (Continued) 86
  • VI The Broken Pitcher 89
  • VII A Wedding Night 108
  • Book Three 119
  • I Notre-Dame 119
  • II A Bird's-Eye View of Paris 128
  • Book Four 153
  • I Kind Souls 153
  • II Claude Frollo 157
  • III Immanis Pecoris Custos Immanior Ipse⋆ [Of a Monstrous Flock a Still More Monstrous Keeper] 163
  • IV The Dog and His Master 171
  • V Claude Frollo (Continued) 173
  • VI Popularity 180
  • Book Five 181
  • I Abbas Beati Martini [The Abbot of Saint-Martin] 181
  • II This Will Kill That 192
  • Book Six 207
  • I An Impartial Look at the Old Magistracy 207
  • II The Rat-Hole 218
  • III The Story of a Maize Cake 223
  • IV A Tear for a Drop of Water 244
  • V The Story of the Cake (Concluded) 254
  • Book Seven 255
  • I Of the Danger of Confiding Your Secret to a Goat 255
  • II A Priest and a Philosopher are Two Different Things 270
  • III The Bells 279
  • IV 'AnÁГkh 282
  • V The Two Men in Black 296
  • VI The Effect That Can Be Produced by Seven Oaths Uttered in the Open Air 302
  • VII The Bogeyman-Monk 307
  • VIII Of the Usefulness of Windows Looking Out on to the River 315
  • Book Eight 323
  • I The Gold Écu Turned into a Dry Leaf 323
  • II The Gold Écu Turned into a Dry Leaf (continued) 333
  • III End of the Gold Écu Turned into a Dry Leaf 338
  • IV Lasciate Ogni Speranza [Ball Hope Abandon . . .] 342
  • V The Mother 356
  • VI Three Men's Hearts Differently Made 361
  • Book Nine 379
  • I Fever 379
  • II Hunchbacked, One-Eyed, Lame 391
  • III Deaf 395
  • IV Earthenware and Crystal 398
  • V The Key to the Red Door 409
  • VI The Key to the Red Door (continued) 412
  • Book Ten, I Gringoire Has Several Good Ideas in Succession in the Rue des Bernardins 417
  • II Become a Truand! 428
  • III Three Cheers for Pleasure! 431
  • IV An Awkward Friend 440
  • V The Private Retreat Where Monsieur Louis of France Says His Hours 460
  • VI Little Blade on the Prowl 491
  • VII Châteapers to the Rescue! 492
  • Book Eleven 495
  • I The Little Shoe 495
  • II La Creatura Bella Bianco Vestita (Dante) 528
  • III Phoebus' Marriage 537
  • IV Quasimodo's Marriage 538
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 561

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.