The Paradoxes of the American Presidency

By Thomas E. Cronin; Michael A. Genovese | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1
1.
Barbara Tuchman, The Distant Mirror ( New York: Knopf, 1978), p. xvii.
2.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Crack-Up (New Directions, 1956), p. 69.
3.
Jeffrey Tulis, "The Two Constitutional Presidencies", in Michael Nelson, ed., The Presidency and the Political System ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1984), p. 61.
4.
See Harvey C. Mansfield Jr., "The Ambivalence of Executive Power", in Joseph Bessette and Jeffrey Tulis, eds., The Presidency in the Constitutional Order ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981), pp. 314-33; and Walter Berns, "The American Presidency: Statesmanship and Constitutionalism in Balance", Imprimis ( January 1983).
5.
See, for example, Godfrey Hodgson, All Things to All Men: The False Promise of the American Presidency ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1981); George Edwards , The Public Presidency ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1983); and Paul Brace and Barbara Hinckley, Follow the Leader: Opinion Polls and the Modern Presidents ( New York: Basic Books, 1992).
6.
Lance Morrow, "Keeping up the Presidential Style", "Time Magazine", June 15, 1981, p. 52.
7.
See Mervin Field, "Public Opinions and Presidential Response", in John Hoy and Melvin Bernstein, eds., The Effective President ( Palisades Press, 1976), pp. 59-77.
8.
William Davison Johnston, TR, Champion of the Strenuous Life ( Theodore Roosevelt Association, 1958), p. 95.
9.
Eugene Kennedy, "Political Power and American Ambivalence", The New York Times Magazine, March 19, 1978.
10.
Richard M. Nixon, Leaders ( New York: Warner Books, 1983), p. 341.
11.
Charles de Gaulle, The Edge of the Sword ( New York: Criterion, 1960).
12.
Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals ( New York: Random House, 1971).
13.
Michael Maccoby, The Gamesman: The New Corporate Leaders ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1976).
14.
Robert J. Morgan, A Whig Embattled: The Presidency under John Tyler ( University of Nebraska Press, 1954), p. 183.

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