Writing under the Raj: Gender, Race, and Rape in the British Colonial Imagination, 1830-1947

By Nancy L. Paxton | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I began this book more than twelve years ago, inspired, in part, by E. M. Forster's fascinating A Passage to India, but it would not have developed into its final form without the financial support of a number of institutions, as well as the ongoing interest and generous efforts of many colleagues and friends. First of all, I cannot adequately express my gratitude for being selected in 1986 as a participant in the Fulbright-Hayes Summer Seminar in India, which allowed me to learn so much about Indian culture in six dizzying weeks of travel throughout the subcontinent. Sharada Nayak, the director of our seminar, could not have been a more gracious and delightful host. She arranged for us to meet many of India's finest scholars, to see unforgettable art and architecture, and to attend superb music and dance performances, and she worked tirelessly behind the scenes to make our travels effortless as well as rewarding. My experiences in India were deepened immeasurably by the conversations and continuing friendship of Cyndi Wasko, Sue Light, Sue Standing, Carol Oldham, and Robert Croonquist.

Significant and timely support for my research on this project also came from the Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellow Program at, Harvard University, where I was awarded a teaching fellowship in 1988-1989. I would especially like to thank Richard M. Hunt, the program's director; Susan Lewis, director of the Freshman Seminar Program; and Marjorie Garber, director of the Center for Literary and Cultural Studies, who provided office space and welcome invitations to many of the center's lectures and seminars. Barbara Johnson, Lewis Wurgaft, Deena Goodman, Joanna Drucker, Mary Berg, Virginia Davidson, and Elizabeth Goodenough all helped to make that year especially productive and stimulating.

The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute provided invaluable support by awarding me a fellowship in fall of 1990. I owe an enormous debt of gratitude

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Writing under the Raj: Gender, Race, and Rape in the British Colonial Imagination, 1830-1947
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.