English Bards and Grecian Marbles: The Relationship between Sculpture and Poetry Especially in the Romantic Period

By Stephen A. Larrabee | Go to book overview
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INDEX
Academic, term, 289
"Adam Naming the Beasts" ( Blake), 102
Addison, 11, 66-75, 84, 97, 265; Pope's praise of, 12; visit to Italy: preference for statuary, 66
Adolphus, J. L., 261
Adonais ( Shelley), 197, 201
Aeneis, The, 58
Age of Bronze, The ( Byron), 166
Akenside, Mark, 7, 44, 75-84, 87, 97, 114n, 288; emotional approach to works of art, 82; satirical thrusts at fashionable taste for Antique, 83
"Alaric in Italy" ( Hemans), 19
Alaric in Rome ( Arnold), 19
Alcuin, of York, 20
Allston, Washington, 137, 234
Ampelus, 198
Ancient and Modern Rome ( Keate), 88
"Ancients," Blake's disciples, 113
Ancients-Moderns controversy, 140
Annus Mirabilis ( Dryden), 12, 58
Antinous, 4
Antique, satirical thrusts at fashionable interest in, 74, 83; English interest in, during late eighteenth century, 89; forms of the Ancients unsuitable vehicles for modern expression, 141; the "old antique," 257-69; see also under Sculpture
Antiquitez de Rome ( Du Bellay), 35
Antiquities of Athens, The ( Stuart and Revert), 87, 99; Blake's engravings for, 104
Antiquities of Rome ( Palladio), 69
Antony, Mark, 164
Antony and Cleopatra ( Shakespeare), 40
Apollo, Hunt's partiality for statues of, 255
"Apollo and the Sunbeams" ( Hunt), 255
Apollo Belvedere, 3, 4, 81, 139, 142, 151, 156, 196, 210, 227, 259 ff. passim, 279; Byron's interpretation of, 163; taken to France by Napoleon, 257; French maid who died for love of, 260, 267, 269, 279
Apologie for Poetrie, An ( Sidney), 34
"Apology for Gebir" ( Landor), 233
Archaeologia Graeca ( Potter), 261
Archaeology, poets' use of books on, 261
Architecture, Greek revival, 87
Aristotle, theory of ideal imitation, 57
Armstrong, John, 90
Arnold, Matthew, 19, 60, 205
Art, fostered by spirit of Liberty, 15, 178 ff., 234, 247, 281; morality, history, and theory of, 15; plastic arts the equals of poetry, 42; Italians awarded prize for expressiveness to, 42, 48; movement to encourage in England, 43; tradition of collecting begun, 45; the "aping" of nature, 47; speaks to senses, 47; discussions popularized history and theory of, 52; aesthetics of, adopted by English, 54; mental dignity of, 91; Neo-Classical and Academic theories transformed into romantic aesthetics, 98, 105; heroic, and Grecian workmanship, 99-105; role of mind in, 106; task of dedicated spirits, 113; ancient and modern divided into parcels, 114; religion and morality of Greeks, 131; Coleridgean antithesis between Gothic and Grecian, 137, 139; civilization comparable to progress of, 178 ff.; and morality, 247-51; placed above poetry, 264n; see also Sculpture
Artists, imitation of classical models, 88; Shelley's account of Florentine, 185
Art of Preserving Health, The ( Armstrong), 90
Art-process, effort to explain nature of, 14; primarily mental or intellectual, 56; described by Landor, 244
Ascham, Roger, 32
Astraea Redux ( Dryden), 54
As You Like It ( Shakespeare), 41

-299-

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