John Reed: The Making of a Revolutionary

By Granville Hicks; John Stuart | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

WITHOUT the assistance of Louise Bryant, who placed at my disposal not only all of John Reed's papers but also her own notes regarding his life, this biography would have been almost impossible. The number of references to the Louise Bryant Collection in Appendix A is some measure of my indebtedness to her.

I am scarcely less indebted to John Stuart, who abandoned his own plan to write a biography of Reed, turned over to me all the material he had gathered, and for nearly a year devoted himself to research for this book. The book owes more than I can say to his faithful examination of newspaper and magazine files an to his resourceful investigation of all sorts of clues. It owes much, too, to his suggestions for the treatment of the material, and, though I have done the actual writing of the book, so that he is not to be held responsible for its faults, I am conscious of the extent to which his judgments have influenced and enriched the presentation.

To the individual members of the Harvard Alumni John Reed Committee and to the committee as a whole I am grateful for many kinds of assistance. It was this committee that made it possible for John Stuart to go to Paris, organize the material that Louise Bryant had so kindly offered to put at my disposal, and bring it back to this country. Its secretary-treasurer, Corliss Lamont, originally suggested my writing the book, and he has repeatedly helped and encouraged me.

A biography such as this, even though one individual retains responsibility, becomes a collective effort. Despite the considerable amount of documentary material available, the book would have been a bare outline if persons who knew John Reed had not come to my aid. More than one hundred and fifty of them did help me, and I gratefully list their names:

Jane Addams, G. W. H. Allen, Sherwood Anderson, William F. Avery, Roger Baldwin, George Gordon Battle, Bessie Beatty, Maurice Becker, George Biddle, Carl Binger, Frank Bohn, F. S. Boyd Hood Broun, Roger Burlingame, John G. Burr, Arthur P. Butler, David Carb, Kate Carew, Stuart Chase, Maximilian Cohen, Saxe Commins, Charles Townsend Copeland, William H. Daly,

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John Reed: The Making of a Revolutionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • I- Boyhood in Portland 1
  • II- Release 16
  • III- "Pain of Growing, Ecstasy of Unfolding" 24
  • IV- To See the World 51
  • V- Proud New York 64
  • VI- Profession: Poet 91
  • VII- The Romantic Revolution 109
  • VIII- Between Wars 136
  • IX- This is Not Our War 148
  • X- Manhattan Revisited 170
  • XI- Eastern Front 183
  • XII- Breathing Spell 204
  • XIII- Almost Thirty 228
  • XIV- Passage to Russia 249
  • XV- The World Shakes 268
  • XVI- Revolutionary and Poet 282
  • XVII- America, 1918 303
  • XVII- Spokesman of the Soviets 321
  • XIX- Discipline 342
  • XX- Revolutionary's Return 365
  • XXI- By the Kremlin Wall 387
  • Acknowledgments 403
  • Appendix A- Notes 407
  • Appendix B- Bibliography 425
  • Index 437
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