John Reed: The Making of a Revolutionary

By Granville Hicks; John Stuart | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A NOTES

SINCE it has seemed unwise to interrupt the pages of this biography with footnotes, I have listed below the principal sources for each chapter, and the careful reader will, I think, have little difficulty in discovering the authority for each statement. The sources are principally of three kinds: Reed's articles, published and unpublished; letters to and from him; and information given me in letters or interviews by persons who knew him.

The largest volume of material at my disposal was the collection preserved by John Reed's widow, Louise Bryant, which includes scores of manuscripts, more than a thousand letters to John Reed and more than a hundred from him, the notebooks that he kept in Mexico and Russia and many miscellaneous notes, pamphlets and newspapers that he had collected, scores of clippings related to him, and a variety of personal possessions. It was placed at my disposal through the generosity of Louise Bryant and with the cooperation of the Harvard Alumni John Reed Committee, which is its custodian. In these notes it is referred to as the L.B.C. All published works by John Reed mentioned in the text are listed in the bibliography (Appendix B).


CHAPTER I

For much of the information in this chapter I am indebted to H. H. Herdman, R. S. Howard, Dr. William S. Ladd, Miss Sally Lewis, Edward S. Martin, Lewis A. McArthur, Mrs. C. O. Rose, MacCormac Snow, Berwick B. Wood, Colonel Charles Erskine Scott Wood and especially Miss Alice Strong. Miss Strong, Mr. McArthur, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn have helped me with copies of articles in Portland newspapers, and Richard G. Montgomery, in addition to giving me what information he could, appealed to others on my behalf.

Reed's description of Lee Sing's celebration of his birth is in an

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