The Essentials of International Public Law and Organization

By Amos S. Hershey | Go to book overview

"Any serious violation of the armistice by one of the parties gives the other party the right to denounce it, and even, in case of urgency, to recommence hostilities immediately" (Art. 40).61

"A violation of the terms of the armistice by individuals acting on their own initiative, only gives the right of demanding the punishment of the offenders, and, if necessary, an indemnity for the losses sustained" (Art. 41).62


BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Laws of Land Warfare (for further references to the main treatises on Int. Law, see supra, notes). -- Ariga, La guerre RussoJaponaise ( 1908), passim; Baker and Crocker, The Laws of Land Warfare ( 1916), and also Baker and McKernan, Laws of Warfare ( 1919), passim (for citations from the authorities); Baty and Morgan, War: Its Conduct and Legal Resuits ( 1914); Boidin, Les lois de la guerre et les deux conferences de la Haye ( 1910); * Bordwell, The Law of War between Belligerents ( 1908), Pt. II; Carpentier, Les lois de la guerre continentale ( 1904); 2 Cobbett, Leading Cases ( 4th ed., 1924), Excursus I, 126-83; Edmonds and Oppenheim, Land Warfare (British Official Exposition); * 1 and 2 Garner, Int. Law and the World War, passim; 1 Guelle, Précis des lois de la guerre ( 1884), passim; Hershey, Russo-Japanese War, passim, particularly chs. 10-11; Higgins, The Hague Peace Conferences ( 1909), passim, particularly 207-80, and War and the Private Citizen ( 1912), chs. 1 and 3; * Holland, The Laws of War on Land ( 1908); Holls, The Peace Conference at The

____________________
of the inhabitants of the districts held by the two belligerents. In the absence of special conditions in the Protocol, the conclusion of the armistice does not free the inhabitants of the occupied territory from the obligation of holding no intercourse with the people in the other belligerent's zone of authority. They may be treated as spies or war traitors if they offend just as if hostilities continued." Ibid., 245-46.
61
H. R., 40. Cf. B. D., 51. As Oppenheim (II, § 239) points out: "Three rules may be formulated from this -- (1) violations which are not serious do not even give the right to denounce an armistice; (2) serious violations do regularly empower the other party to denounce the armistice, but not, as a rule, to recommence hostilities at once without notice; (3) only in case of urgency is a party justified in recommencing hostilities without notice."
62
H. R., 41. Cf. B. D., 52. It should be added that "a treaty of peace, after signature, but before ratification, operates as a general armistice." Holland, No. 99.

For Bibliographies on Armistices, see pp. 404-05 of the first edition of this work; and 2 Oppenheim, p. 320 of 3d ed., or pp. 387-88 of 4th ed. On the Armistice with Germany of Nov. 11, 1918, see 2 Hyde, § 647. For the views of leading authorities on Armistices, see Baker and Crocker, Laws of Land Warfare, 256 ff.

-610-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Essentials of International Public Law and Organization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 784

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.