The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research

By Robin Higham; Steven E. Woodworth | Go to book overview

3 Bibliographies

T. Michael Parrish

At first glance, the universe of Civil War bibliographies of printed works and guides to manuscripts and other sources seems rich and rational, but in many ways it remains incomplete and disjointed. For the general reader and beginning student, several outstanding reference works are available, yet for the serious scholar requiring complete coverage on any given topic, research often proves daunting, tedious, and frustrating. Until the United States Civil War Center at Louisiana State University accomplishes its goal of establishing a comprehensive interdisciplinary bibliographical database describing all printed items, manuscripts, and other relevant sources on the Civil War, the task of locating every relevant item will remain an inexact science. Fortunately for most researchers, as Arthur W. Bergeron, Jr. has observed, "Discovering that nugget of golden information in some obscure source gives meaning to the phrase the thrill of the hunt."

A first step for asserting order to the confusion can be accomplished by consulting the best general guide to reference books on all aspects of American history, Francis Paul Prucha Handbook for Research in American History ( Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1987; rev. ed. 1994). In addition, recently published reference works on American history are evaluated annually in the March issue of Journal of American History under the heading "Research and Reference Tools: Reviews." Equally valuable is Carol Bondus Fitzgerald American History: A Bibliographical Review (Westport, CT: Meckler Publishing Co., 1985- 1990), an annual publication offering detailed reviews. A comprehensive source for identifying the many reference books published in the United States in all fields of research each year is Bohdan S. Wynar, American Reference Books Annual

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The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword James M. Mcpherson ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction Steven E. Woodworth xiii
  • Part I - General Secondary Sources 1
  • 1 - Surveys and Textbooks 3
  • Bibliography 9
  • 2 - General Reference Works 11
  • Bibliography 20
  • 3 - Bibliographies 23
  • Bibliography 27
  • 4 - Periodical Indexes 39
  • Bibliography 44
  • 5 - Genealogical Sources 46
  • Summary 52
  • Summary 52
  • Part II - General Primary Sources 57
  • 6 - Memoirs, Diaries, and Letters 59
  • Letters 73
  • 7 - Published Papers 75
  • Bibliography 83
  • 8 - Unpublished Manuscript Collections 85
  • Bibliography 94
  • Part III - Illustrative Materials 97
  • 9 - Maps, Charts, and Atlases 99
  • Bibliography 108
  • 10 - Photographs and Drawings 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Part IV - Causation--Events Leading to the War 119
  • 11 - Slavery, Race, and Culture 121
  • Bibliography 128
  • 12 - Constitutional and Political Factors 131
  • Bibliography 141
  • 13 - Economic Factors 144
  • Bibliography 151
  • Part V - International Relations 155
  • 14 - Union International Relations 157
  • Bibliography 169
  • 15 - Confederate International Relations 177
  • Bibliography 184
  • Part VI - Leaders 187
  • 16 - Abraham Lincoln 189
  • Bibliography 200
  • 17 - Jefferson Davis 203
  • Bibliography 209
  • 18 - Union Civilian Leaders 216
  • Bibliography 225
  • 19 - Confederate Civilian Leaders 234
  • Bibliography 240
  • Part VII - Strategy and Tactics: Operations, Campaigns, and Battles 245
  • 20 - Eastern Theater 247
  • Bibliography 260
  • 21 - Western Theater 270
  • Bibliography 283
  • 22 - Trans-Mississippi Theater 287
  • Bibliography 295
  • 23 - War on Inland Waters 298
  • Bibliography 306
  • 24 - War at Sea 313
  • Bibliography 326
  • Part VIII - Conduct of the War 333
  • 25 - Leadership--Union Army Officers 335
  • Bibliography 341
  • 26 - Leadership--Confederate Army Officers 346
  • Bibliography 352
  • 27 - Leadership--Union Naval Officers 357
  • Bibliography 364
  • 28 - Leadership--Confederate Naval Officers 368
  • Bibliography 373
  • 29 - Modern War/Total War 379
  • Bibliography 387
  • 30 - Ordnance 390
  • Biblliography 400
  • 31 - Supplies 405
  • Conclusion 413
  • 32 - Intelligence Activities 419
  • Bibliography 428
  • 33 - Medical Activities 433
  • Suggested Areas for Future Research 445
  • 34 - Enlisted Soldiers 454
  • Bibliography 464
  • 35 - Prison Camps and Prisoners of War 466
  • Bibliography 475
  • Part IX - The Home Front 479
  • 36 - Northern State and Local Politics 481
  • Bibliography 490
  • 37 - Southern State and Local Politics 494
  • Bibliography 500
  • 38 - Industry, Agriculture, and the Economy 505
  • Bibliography 512
  • 39 - Northern Social Conditions 515
  • 40 - Southern Social Conditions 530
  • Bibliography 537
  • Part X - Reconstruction and Beyond 545
  • 41 - Southern Occupation 547
  • Bibliography 556
  • 42 - Economics 561
  • Bibliography 571
  • 43 - Emancipation, Freedmen, and the Freedmen's Bureau 576
  • Bibliography 584
  • 44 - Veterans' Organizations and Memories of the War 586
  • Notes 596
  • Part XI - Popular Media 601
  • 45 - Novels and Other Fictional Accounts 603
  • Conclusion 610
  • 46 - Films and Television 613
  • Bibliography 619
  • 47 - Musical and Narrative Recordings 620
  • Bibliography 657
  • Appendix - Publishers and Dealers of Civil War Literature 659
  • Index 679
  • Bout the Contributors 753
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