The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research

By Robin Higham; Steven E. Woodworth | Go to book overview

20 Eastern Theater

Stephen Davis

The "eastern theater" of the Civil War has generally come to mean Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, at least partly because actions fought in the Carolinas, eastern Georgia, and Florida were either naval in origin or scant in number, until Sherman brought the western theater east late in the war. Civil War historians' study of the eastern theater in the past half-century has brought forth a large number of books devoted to the campaigns and major battles. Adding to this voluminous literature are the countless articles published in both scholarly journals (e.g., Civil War History, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography) and popular magazines such as Civil War Times Illustrated (begun as Civil War Times in 1959) and Blue and Gray ( 1984-). The following review will highlight the most important writing on the war in the East. For these purposes, "eastern theater" will largely mean the Virginia front, except for occasional land battles to the south that are worthy of mention.

When Civil War enthusiasts approach the study of the war in Virginia, they must sooner or later come to terms with Douglas Southall Freeman Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command ( 1942- 1944). Indeed, one may say that the modern historiography of battles and campaigns in Virginia begins with Lee's Lieutenants. Essentially the story of the Army of Northern Virginia while under Lee's command, Freeman's narrative emphasizes the successes and failures of the army's key generals and how Lee sought to find competent replacements. Half of volume 1 is devoted to the Confederate army in Virginia before Lee took command, June 1, 1862; thence it relates Jackson's Valley campaign and the Seven Days' Battles. Volume 2 carries the story from Cedar Mountain to Chancellorsville, August 1862-May 1863. Freeman's third volume covers the

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.