The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research

By Robin Higham; Steven E. Woodworth | Go to book overview

Daniel argues that the artillery in this western army suffered from a lack of sufficient logistical support and generals, with the exception of Joseph Johnston, who never really understood its proper role on the battlefield.

The Union equivalent of these two studies of Confederate artillery is L. Van Loan Naisawald's Grape and Canister ( 1960). Naisawald traces the history of the artillery in the Army of the Potomac, arguing that Federal cannons were never used to their fullest potential until the Battle of Gettysburg and even after suffered from the disadvantage of restricted fields of fire in the woodlands of Virginia.

The writings highlighted in this chapter represent some of the best material available on the subject of Civil War ordnance. Many of these works can be considered definitive. After all, there is only so much one can say about the specifications of a model 1853 Enfield rifle musket or the advantages and disadvantages of Schenkl versus Parrott shells. Yet there is still plenty of room for continued research and writing on this general topic. Still open to interpretation and revision is the human dimension of ordnance as seen through the selection and employment of these weapons on the battlefield. There is much to be learned as well about the administrative aspects of ordnance, especially in regard to the U.S. Ordnance Department. Our knowledge of domestic and foreign ordnance manufacturing and supply for the United States and the Confederacy also remains incomplete.


BIBLLIOGRAPHY

Abbot Henry Larcom. Siege Artillery in the Campaigns against Richmond, with Notes on the 15-Inch Gun. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1867.

Albaugh William Archibald. Confederate Edged Weapons. New York: Harper, 1960.

-----. Handbook of Confederate Swords. Harriman, TN: Pioneer Press, 1951.

Albaugh William Archibald, Hugh Benet Jr., and Edward N. Simmons. Confederate Handguns. Philadelphia: Riling and Lentz, 1963.

Albaugh William Archibald, and Edward N. Simmons. Confederate Arms. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole, 1957.

Albaugh William Archibald, and Richard D. Steuart. The Original Confederate Colt. New York: Greenberg, 1953.

Austerman Wayne. "Abhorrent to Civilization: The Explosive Bullet in the Civil War." Civil War Times Illustrated 24 ( September 1985): 36-40.

-----. "Case Shot and Canister." Civil War Times Illustrated 26 ( September 1987): 16-29, 43-48.

-----. "Maynard." Civil War Times Illustrated 25 ( April 1986): 42-45.

-----. "The Northern Spencer Goes South." Civil War Times Illustrated 23 ( May 1984): 26-30, 34-35.

Banks Ron. "Death at a Distance." Civil War Times Illustrated 29 ( March-April 1990): 48-55.

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