The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research

By Robin Higham; Steven E. Woodworth | Go to book overview

45 Novels and Other Fictional Accounts

Sharon L. Gravett

In an essay published in 1961, Robert Penn Warren asserts that the "Civil War is, for the American imagination, the great single event of our history. Without too much wrenching, it may, in fact, be said to be American history" (p. 270). This war had such an imaginative impact, he says, because it was "the prototype of all war, for in the persons of fellow citizens who happen to be the enemy, we meet again, with the old ambivalence of love and hate and with all the old quilts, the blood brothers of our childhood" (pp. 300-301). A conflict between the past and the future, between Southern agrarianism and Northern industrialism, between states' rights and unionism, between principles of equality and slavery, the Civil War raised issues that continue to reverberate into the present, thus providing an exceptionally rich and varied canvas for literature. This literature challenges contemporary readers both to comprehend the war in its own time and to realize its continuing impact. Warren suggests that readers need to transport themselves "into the documented, re-created moment of the past and, in a double vision, see the problems and values of that moment and those of our own, set against each other in mutual criticism and clarification" (p. 306).

This task of examining the literature of the American Civil War is a complex one, not only because of the difficulties inherent in the works themselves, but also because of the sheer volume of literature available. Literally thousands of works of fiction have been written about the Civil War and its aftermath. Albert J. Menendez's Civil War Novels: An Annotated Bibliography ( 1986) lists 1,028 entries. Authors as diverse as Richard Adams ( Traveller, 1988), Horatio Alger ( Frank's Campaign, 1864), Louis Auchincloss ( Watchfires, 1982), James M. Cain ( Mignon, 1962, and Past All Dishonor, 1946), Willa Cather ( Sapphira andthe Slave Girl

-603-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.