Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview

MRS. ELIZA POTTER.

IN the whole history of the rebellion, so recently suppressed, there was nothing more deserving of our admiration, nothing which appeals more strongly to our feelings of reverence for moral heroism, than the conduct of the few loyal women of the South. The number of persons of either sex, in any community, who have the moral courage to stand up in defiance of the sentiments and prejudices of the overwhelming majority of that community, especially on questions involving the rights and constitution of the State, when that majority are so frantic with rage and excitement as to be ready to put down any opposition by violence or murder, is very small. To maintain such a position of opposition for more than four years, when it involved complete isolation from society, constant obloquy and abuse, the loss of property, and the frequent peril of life, required a heroism to which comparatively few ever attain.

The loyal women of the South, solely from the love they bore to their country and its cause, endured all these trials and hardships. Personal, political, or pecuniary rewards they could not hope for; it was much if their lives were not the forfeit of their patriotism. Yet none made such sacrifices as they to minister to our sick and wounded soldiers, prisoners in the hands of the enemy.

It is to the work of one of the bravest and truest of these--a woman whose faithful and untiring labors have hitherto found no record save in the hearts of the thousands to whom she

-95-

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