Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview
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MRS. EDWIN GREBLE.

AMONG the ardently loyal women of Philadelphia, by whom such great and untiring labors for the soldiers were performed, few did better service in a quiet and unostentatious manner than Mrs. Greble. Indeed so very quietly did she work that she almost fulfilled the Scripture injunction of secrecy as to good deeds.

The maiden name of Mrs. Greble was Susan Virginia Major. She was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, being descended on the mother's side from a family of Quakers who were devoted to their country in the days of the Revolution with a zeal so active and outspoken as to cause them to lose their membership in the Society of Friends. Fighting Quakers there have been in both great American wars, men whose principles of peace, though not easily shaken, were less firm than their patriotism, and their traits have in many instances been emulated in the female members of their families. This seems to have been the case with Mrs. Greble.

Her eldest son, John, she devoted to the service of his country. He entered the Military Academy at West Point in 1850, at the age of sixteen, graduating honorably, and continuing in the service until June, 1861, when he fell at the disastrous battle of Great Bethel, one of the earliest martyrs of liberty in the rebellion. Another son, and the only one remaining after the death of the lamented Lieutenant Greble, when but eighteen years of age, enlisted, served faithfully, and nearly lost his life by typhoid

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