Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview

MICHIGAN SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY.

FEW of the States of the Northwest, patriotic as they all were, present as noble a record as Michigan. Isolated by its position from any immediate peril from the rebel forces, (unless we reckon their threatened raids from Canada, in the last year of the War), its loyal and Union-loving citizens volunteered with a promptness, and fought with a courage surpassed by no troops in the Armies of the Republic. They were sustained in their patriotic sacrifices by an admirable home influence. The successive Governors of the State, during the war, its Senators and Representatives in Congress, and its prominent citizens at home, all contributed their full share toward keeping up the fervor of the brave soldiers in the field. Nor were the women of the State inferior to the other sex in zeal and selfsacrifice. The services of Mrs. Annie Etheridge, and of Bridget Divers, as nurses in the field-hospitals, and under fire are elsewhere recorded in this volume. Others were equally faithful and zealous, who will permit no account of their labors of love to be given to the public. There were from an early period of the war two organizations in the State, which together with the Northwestern Sanitary Commission, received and forwarded the supplies contributed throughout the State for the soldiers to the great depôts of distribution at Louisville, St. Louis, and New York. These were "The Soldiers' Relief Committee," and the Soldiers' Aid Society of Detroit. There were also State agencies at Washington and New York, well managed, and which rendered early

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