Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview

LADIES' UNION RELIEF ASSOCIA- TIONS OF BALTIMORE.

A MIDST the malign influences of secession and treason, entire and unqualified devotion to the Union, shone with additional brightness from its contrast with surrounding darkness. In all portions of the South were found examples of this patriotic devotion, and nowhere did it display itself more nobly than in the distracted city of Baltimore. The Union people were near enough to the North with its patriotic sentiment, and sufficiently protected by the presence of Union soldiery, to be able to act with the freedom and spontaneity denied to their compatriots of the extreme South, and they did act nobly for the cause of their country and its defenders.

Among the ladies of Baltimore, few were more constantly or conspicuously employed, for the benefit of sufferers from the war, than MRS. ELIZABETH M. STREETER. With the modesty that almost invariably accompanies great devotion and singleness of purpose she sought no public notice; but in the case of one so actively employed in good works, it was impossible to avoid it.

More than one of the Associations of Ladies formed in Baltimore for the relief of soldiers, of their families, and of refugees from secession, owes its inception, organization, and successful career to the mind and energies of Mrs. Streeter. It may truly be said of her that she has refused no work which her hands could find to accomplish.

Mrs. Streeter was the wife of the late Hon. S. F. Streeter, Esq.,

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