Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview
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NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS' RELIEF ASSOCIATION.

THE " New England Society," of New York City, is an Association of long standing, for charitable and social purposes, and is composed of natives of New England, residing in New York, and its vicinity. Soon after the outbreak of the war, this society became the nucleus of a wider and less formal organization--the Sons of New England. In April, 1862, these gentlemen formed the New England Soldiers' Relief Association, whose object was declared to be "to aid and care for all sick and wounded soldiers passing through the city of New York, on their way to or from the war." On the 8th of April, its "Home," a building well adapted to its purposes, was opened at No. 198 Broadway, and Dr. Everett Herrick, was appointed its resident Surgeon, and Mrs. E. A. Russell, its Matron. The Home was a hospital as well as a home, and in its second floor accommodated a very considerable number of patients. Its Matron was faithful and indefatigable in her performance of her duties, and in the three years of her service had under her care more than sixty thousand soldiers, many of them wounded or disabled.

A Women's Auxiliary Committee was formed soon after the establishment of the Association, consisting of thirty ladies who took their turn of service as nurses for the sick and wounded through the year, and provided for them additional luxuries and delicacies to those furnished by the Association and the Govern

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