Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview
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OTHER FRIENDS OF THE FREED-
MEN AND REFUGEES.

IN many of the preceding sketches we have had occasion to notice the labors of ladies who had been most distinguished in other departments of the great Army work, in behalf of the Freedmen, or the Refugees. Mrs. Harris devoted in all five or six months to their care at Nashville and its vicinity. Miss Tyson and Mrs. Beck gave their valuable services to their relief. Miss Jane Stuart Woolsey was, and we believe still is laboring in behalf of the Freedmen in Richmond or its vicinity. Mrs. Governor Hawley of Connecticut was among the first to instruct them a Fernandina and Hilton Head. Miss Gilson devoted nearly the whole of the last year of her service in the army to the freedmen and the hospital for colored soldiers. In the West, Mrs. Lucy E. Starr, while Matron of the Soldiers' Home at Memphis, bestowed a large amount of labor on the Refugees who were congregated in great numbers in that city. Mrs. Clinton B. Fisk, the wife of the gallant Christian, General Fisk, exerted herself to collect clothing, money and supplies for the Refugees, black and white, at Pilot Knob, Missouri, and distributed it to them in person. Mrs. H. F. Hoes and Miss Alice F. Royce of Wisconsin, were very active in instructing and aiding the children of Refugees at Rolla, Missouri, in 1864 and 1865. Mrs. John S. Phelps established with the aid of a few other ladies a school for the children of Refugees

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