Eisenhower and the American Crusades

By Herbert S. Parmet | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 26
The Senator and the President

T HE FIRST HALF of 1953 was a critical period in the Administration's coexistence with Joe McCarthy. The Senator, who had complained that the Democrats had given the nation "twenty years of treason," professed his loyalty to the new President at every opportunity. Even on the Senate floor he cited his campaign efforts with vehemence. He gave himself credit for having made more speeches for General Eisenhower than most of his colleagues and glowed about the Administration's early "batting average." Yet, in a series of cases that received wide attention, he had become openly critical. Before the Administration had completed its first six months, speculation had grown about how long Ike would evade a head-on clash with the front-page-grabbing Senator.

McCarthy, of course, was working on a good thing. His personal ambitions were unlimited. Not even the removal of the Democrats from commanding positions could dissuade him from continuing his crusade. Toward Eisenhower his attitude soon became contemptuous. He appraised him as a "political lightweight" who was out of his element in dealing with the Washington infighting. He was, thought McCarthy, essentially a military man whose commanders were now a White House clique that was insinuating its own prejudices and ideas on the President. Eisenhower himself was not dangerous because he was conservative, but "left-wingers" like Sherman Adams and C. D. Jackson could corrupt him with ease. For they were the ones unsympathetic toward "strong patriotism" and Americanism and would "coddle Communists and left- wingers in government and listen to their advice." Of all the important personalities of the Administration, only Vice President Nixon had Mc

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eisenhower and the American Crusades
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.