Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate

By Wolf Schneider; Ingeborg Sammet et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
THE LABYRINTH OF KNOSSOS

THE OLDEST European city of which we have knowledge probably was Knossos on the island of Crete. It is no accident, that city culture, an Oriental invention, reached Europe through its most southerly extension.

Most of the oldest cities and the first metropolises were grouped about latitude 30 degrees north, which cuts across today's Cairo. During the last centuries B.C., city culture slowly gravitated to the 40th parallel, which runs north of Athens and south of Rome. Modern European cities with millions of inhabitants all are between the 40th and 60th parallels, Athens being the only exception.

So the first European city developed in its southernmost part. Crete is situated at an equal distance of 341 miles from the mouth of the Nile and from the island of Cyprus, which belonged to the empire of Hammurabi of Babylon about 1700 B.C. This distance of 341 miles appeared negligible already to the seafarers of the second millennium. No doubt Crete had profited greatly from the influence of Babylonian and Egyptian civilization.

Situated on a hill near the island's northern shore, among vineyards and olive groves, the palace of Knossos, one of the most remarkable structures in history, was built probably in the seventeenth century B.C. Surrounding an inner courtyard 180 feet long, rose a monumental palace structure of more than four hundred halls, rooms, chambers, hallways, stairways, and inner courts. The entire building covered an area of 558 by 512 feet, equalling 6.4 acres, and some of its parts were four storeys high. As the palace picturesquely sloped down the hill, the highest floors in the east wing were lower than the large courtyard at ground level.

The wanderer was greeted from afar by the magnificent white pillars. Large picture windows, as yet without glass panes, testified to the architectural development as well as to the carefree spirit of the masters of the palace, because large windows were in those times a tremendous luxury and extravagance. Walls and ceilings were decorated with stucco reliefs and frescoes, from which we learn how ornately and artfully the women of Knossos dressed. Bathrooms, water closets, a drainage system, and pits for refuse were taken for granted.

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.