Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate

By Wolf Schneider; Ingeborg Sammet et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
PETER'S BURGH AND STALIN'S CITY

THE RUSSIAN Revolution differed from the English in that it was not a revolution of the city, but a revolution within the city, such as the French had been. And it, too, has changed the world; in fact, it is still busily doing so. No other cities have made as much history as those in the vast land between the Baltic Sea and Bering Strait. Two of these cities were named for outstanding men, though not by their proper names, Ulyanov and Dzhugashvili, but by their pseudonyms, Lenin and Stalin.

Our Russian Empire consists of a great number of cities -- capital cities, governmental cities, district cities, provincial cities . . . and, in addition, of a venerable old residence, and of the mother of all Russian cities. The venerable old residential city is Moscow, and the mother of all Russian cities is Kiev. Petersburg also belongs to the Russian imperium.

With such plain disparagement, the Russian poet Andrei Bely introduced in 1913 the capital of the Tsarist empire in a novel called Petersburg. The artificial metropolis built by Peter the Great never became popular with the Russian people.

"The first requirement for the expression of national sentiment in Russia is to hate Petersburg with heart and soul!" The fanatic patriot Ivan Aksakov wrote these words to Dostoyevsky from Moscow. And the latter wrote of the "twofold misfortune of living in St. Petersburg, the most intentional and abstract city on the globe".

The intention to which Dostoyevsky refers was that of a great, wild, stubborn man, Peter I, called the Great, who in 1682 at the age of ten ascended the throne of the Tsars and who led his country to the rank of a world power during the forty-three years of his. reign. Impetuous and unscrupulous, he even tried to push it into the orbit of European civilization.

He began with reforms concerning dress and the old-Russian full beard; and ultimately he chose a new capital as a decisive means of changing the character of his country: he transferred the capital from Moscow, the treasure trove of tradition in the heart of Russia,

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.