Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate

By Wolf Schneider; Ingeborg Sammet et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
BRASILIA AND ITS KIND

IN MANY places between New York, Diisseldorf, and Milan monumental buildings -- functional ones -- are still going up, thanks mainly to the large industrial concerns and the insurance companies. (They prove, incidentally, that not everything monumental is beautiful.) In New York the immense concentration of such buildings, with their exaggerated ostentation -- in a free competition of conceit, as it were -- has nevertheless created a vital and impressive city.

Even in antiquity it sometimes happened that cities were built according to carefully worked-out plans, although compared with the labyrinthine cities they seldom endured. Planning consisted mainly of establishing a pattern of streets which, if need be, could be extended in all directions. This was, of course, a rather basic decision, because there is hardly anything more permanent in a city than the course of its streets, which generally outlives all architectural changes by hundreds and often thousands of years. During the reconstruction efforts in the large German cities after the Second World War, changes in the course of streets were only very rarely made. The Hohe Strasse in Cologne still follows exactly the same route it took in Roman days.

The checkerboard pattern -- straight streets with right-angle intersections and, consequently, rectangular building areas -- has always been highly favoured. About 3000 B.C., Mohenjo-Daro was built in this pattern. The geometrically fixed limits of the barracks cities which in the Soviet Union always sprout when a new industrial site is being developed have as their oldest model the quadratically arranged streets of Kahun, the town built by Pharaoh Sesostris II about 1890 B.C. to house the labourers who were building the Pyramid of Illahun. Even in Babylon all streets outside the temple area were intersected at right angles.

Along strictly geometric lines and for the first time completely planned in all its functions was Miletus, which was built by the architect Hippodamus. Against strong resistance from the representatives of agrarian reform, he turned the checkerboard pattern, which he insisted upon, and which often necessitated tremendous

-344-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Babylon Is Everywhere: The City as Man's Fate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.