...And Economic Justice for All: Welfare Reform for the 21st Century

By Michael L. Murray | Go to book overview

SUMMARY

Capitalism, with its attendant market-based economy, is the best system yet devised for accumulating wealth. Its primary shortcoming is the lousy job it does of distributing wealth. It is both necessary and desirable for people in a prosperous country to utilize the government to rectify the unjust distribution. This should be done in a manner which minimizes the adverse effects on the market. Our current welfare system does not meet this criterion. A guaranteed adequate income would.


Notes
1.
Robert Heilbroner, 21st Century Capitalism, pp. 95-96.
2.
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887, p. 282.
3.
Heilbroner, 21st Century Capitalism, pp. 26-29.
5.
"Can Private Sector Outdo Government?" Cedar Rapids [Iowa] Gazette, December 1, 1986, p. 2A.
6.
Heilbroner, 21st Century Capitalism, p. 74.
7.
In practice, however, some face considerably more impediments than others. I suggested in Chapter 2 that the story of Horatio Alger (the poor boy who strikes it rich) is of such enduring interest because it represents not the norm but the rare exception. Perhaps the fairest opportunity for becoming rich today is the lottery. The probability of success, although slim, may be as high as that of working one's way from poverty to wealth, and one's chances are not a function of natural endowments. As a society, however, we prefer that people try to get rich the old-fashioned way because it encourages the development of talent and ability.
8.
Again the caution--we really can't prove they grow faster than other economies.
9.
Heilbroner issues a cautionary note in this regard: "It is possible--or better perhaps, it is not impossible--that the coming decades will witness a series of massive technological stimuli of the kind that have propelled us forward with irregular regularity over the past two centuries. . . . Alas, the same can be said for a drearier possibility, namely that the future will be dominated by periods of stagnation and decline." Heilbroner, 21st Century Capitalism, p. 62.
10.
It is not likely, however, that we can continue to sustain the level of growth we have seen in western countries in recent centuries. I side with those who believe resource limitations will eventually take their toll. The mystical

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
...And Economic Justice for All: Welfare Reform for the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Life Is Not Fair, but People Can Be 11
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Are You Worthy? Current U.S. Welfare Programs 41
  • Notes 65
  • 3 - The Market Who Gets What, Why, and Whether 75
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - Work--Who Needs It? 107
  • Notes 124
  • 5 - We Are What We Were 129
  • Notes 145
  • 6 - Why the Guaranteed Adequate Income 153
  • Appendix Results of Negative Income Tax Experiments 169
  • 7 - The History of Guaranteed Income Plans 178
  • Notes 187
  • 8 - The Guaranteed Adequate Income Proposal 190
  • Notes 201
  • 9 - Cost and Funding Calculations 204
  • 10 - Final Thoughts 222
  • References 227
  • Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.