The Political Economy of World Energy: A Twentieth-Century Perspective

By John G. Clark | Go to book overview
provide power for coal liquefication plants. Both nations, dangerously dependent upon oil imports, shored up their domestic stockpiles through regulations controlling the oil trade, promoting domestic refining, and subjecting foreign refiners to mandatory stockpiling quotas.57These measures, as Japan and Germany fully realized, would not fuel the wars that each contemplated. Plans evolved to conquer the oil producing territories of their enemies, particularly Romania, Soviet Caucasia, the Middle East, and the NEI. Myopically and soporifically, the USA, Britain, and France watched the aggressor states openly prepare to strike.
Notes
1. A quote taken from J. G. Clark, Energy and the Federal Government: Fossil Fuel Policies, 1900-1948, Urbana: University of Illinois Press ( 1986), p. 169.
2. League of Nations, Economic and Financial Section, International Economic Conference, Geneva, May, 1927, Memorandum on Coal, Vol. I, Geneva: League of Nations ( 1927), pp. 74-5; J. Darmstadter et al., Energy in the World Economy: A Statistical Review of Trends in Output, Trade, and Consumption Since 1925, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press for Resources for the Future ( 1971), pp. 652-91.
3. For the above two paragraphs: J. Abu-Lughod, Cairo: 1001 Years of the City Victorious, Princeton: Princeton University Press ( 1971), pp. 96, 158-74; W. Dean, The Industrialization of São Paulo, 1880-1945, Austin: University of Texas Press for the Institute of Latin American Studies ( 1969); pp. 110-17; P. Monbeig, La Croissance tie la Ville de São Paulo, Grenoble: lnstitut et Revue de Géographie Alpine ( 1953), pp. 56-76; Electrical Equipment Division, Electrical Development and Guide to Marketing Electrical Equipment in Brazil, US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Trade Information Bulletin No. 496, Washington, DC: GPO ( 1927), pp. ii, 4-7.
4. Interwar does not precisely fit the Japanese experience. The Sino-Japanese conflict of 1931--the Mukden incident--led to the occupation of Manchuria and the establishment of the puppet state of Manchukuo in 1932.
5. For the above two paragraphs: The Japanese-Manchoukuo Year Book, 1938, Tokyo: The Japan-Manchoukuo Year Book Co. ( 1938), pp. 386-7, 402; Mitsubishi Economic Research Bureau, Japanese Trade and Industry Present and Future, London: Macmillan ( 1936), pp. 135, 311-22; T. Yazaki , Social Change and the City in Japan From the earliest times through the Industrial Revolution, translated by D. L. Swain, San Francisco: Japan Publications, Inc. ( 1968), p. 384; E. B. Schumpeter, ed., The Industrialization of Japan and Manchukuo, 1930-1940: Population, Raw Materials, and Industry, New York: Macmillan ( 1940), pp. 415-17, 832; League of Nations, Economic and Financial Section, International Economic Conference, Geneva, May 1927, Electric Industry

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of World Energy: A Twentieth-Century Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 397

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.