Poor Children and Welfare Reform

By Olivia Golden | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to express my appreciation to the Foundation for Child Development for its support of this research. At a personal level, I am deeply grateful to Barbara Blum, President of the foundation, and to Susan Blank, Project Officer, for their unwavering enthusiasm for the project. I would also like to express enormous gratitude to Mary Skinner, Project Director, and Ruth Baker, Research Assistant, for their talent, commitment, and wisdom at every stage of the research design and execution. As Project Director, Mary Skinner collaborated on the research design, supervised the site selection and site visit process, conducted three site visits, and participated in two others. Her creativity, careful judgment, and original insights have deeply influenced the study report. Ruth Baker assisted impeccably in the research design and the site selection, provided invaluable help in organizing information and logistics for the site visits, participated in two of the visits, and wrote thoughtful initial drafts of two of the case studies. In addition, I want to thank William Clark, who provided valuable assistance in site visit preparation and information collection as an undergraduate assistant to the project.

The members of the Project Advisory Board deserve special thanks for their willingness to read drafts and answer questions. The members are: Dr. J. Lawrence Aber, Columbia University; Dr. Jerome Kagan, Harvard University, Dr. Sharon Lynn Kagan, Yale University; Allen Kraus, former Deputy Commissioner for Income Maintenance of the New York City Human Resources Administration; Gwen Morgan, Work/Family Directions; Dr. Julius Richmond, Harvard University; Lucy Williams, Northeastern University.

For extraordinarily thoughtful and helpful comments on the many drafts of this study, I would like to thank Mary Jo Bane, Susan Blank, Mark

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poor Children and Welfare Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 193

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.