Poor Children and Welfare Reform

By Olivia Golden | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1
1
The estimate of the number of welfare workers is drawn from Steve Jenkins, Cheryl Dorsey, and Olivia Golden, "Characteristics of Service Deliverers: Who Delivers Services to Poor Children?" (Unpublished paper prepared for the executive session, entitled "Making the System Work for Poor Children," Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, Wiener Center for Social Policy, updated June 1989), 8, n. 29. The average monthly number of families on AFDC in fiscal year 1990 was 3.97 million. See U.S. Congress, House, Committee on Ways and Means, Overview of Entitlement Programs: 1991 Green Book, Background Material and Data on Programs within the Jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means. 102nd Congr., 1st session ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991), 618.
2
Lisbeth Schorr with Daniel Schorr, Within Our Reach: Breaking the Cycle of Disadvantage ( New York: Doubleday, Anchor Press, 1988), xvii-xix.
3
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Series P-60, no. 175, Current Population Reports, Poverty in the United States: 1990 ( Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991), 2, 18, and 195. For a discussion of trends in child poverty and the characteristics of poor children, see Clifford M. Johnson, Leticia Miranda, Arloc Sherman, and James D. Weill , Child Poverty in America ( Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 1991).
4
See, for example, reviews of the evidence in: Naomi Carol Goldstein, "Explaining Socioeconomic Differences in Children's Cognitive Test Scores," Discussion paper H-90-1 ( Cambridge, MA: Wiener Center for Social Policy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, January 1990). Naomi Carol Goldstein, "'Why Poverty Is Bad for Children," (Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, ( Harvard University, 1991), 21-62.

-171-

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