Jazz Poetry: From the 1920s to the Present

By Sascha Feinstein | Go to book overview
12
In his essay Spirituals, Blues, and Jazz: The Negro in the Lively Arts ( 1945), Brown stated that most blues "express sorrow in love" and that others "tell of rambling, of leaving an oppressive place" (64). As a third category, he notes, "And some, such as ' Back Water Blues' by Bessie Smith, about the Mississippi in flood, deal starkly with the tragedies of nature" (65).
13
With regard to Tolson's recent recognition, Robert M. Farnsworth has been invaluable, not merely for his excellent biographical study titled Melvin B. Tolson 1898-1966 ( 1984) but also for editing the uncollected newspaper columns written by Tolson ( Caviar and Cabbage, 1982) as well as Tolson's lengthy series of poems, A Gallery of Harlem Portraits ( 1979).
14
There have been some discrepancies about the full effects of Tolson's rejection. Although Tolson himself told Joy Flasch that he had "put his 'manwrecked' manuscript in a trunk" and had not written for many years afterwards, Farnsworth explains that, in actuality, "The late thirties and early forties, the years during and immediately following publishers' rejections of A Gallery, were in fact particularly productive years in Tolson's career" (62).

REFERENCES

Bontemps Arna, and Langston Hughes. Arna Bontemps-Langston Hughes Letters 1925-1967. Ed. Charles H. Nichols. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1980.

Brown Patrick James. "Jazz Poetry: Definition, Analysis, and Performance"." Diss. University of Southern California, 1978.

Brown Sterling A. The Collected Poems of Sterling A. Brown. New York: Harper & Row, 1980.

------. Southern Road. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1932.

------. "Spirituals, Blues, and Jazz: The Negro in the Lively Arts". Tricolor 3 ( 1945): 62-70.

Carruth Hayden. Sitting In: Selected Writings on Jazz, Blues, and Related Topics. Iowa City: University of Iowa, 1986.

Cullen Countee. "Poet on Poet"." Opportunity 4 ( March 4, 1926): 73-74.

Fabio Sarah Webster. "Who Speaks Negro?" Negro Digest. 14 ( September 1966): 54-58.

Farnsworth Robert M. Melvin B. Tolson, 1898-1966: Plain Talk and Poetic Prophecy. Columbia: University of Missouri, 1984.

"Five Silhouettes on the Slope of Mount Parnassus"." The New York Times Book Review ( March 21, 1926): 6, 16.

Gabbin Joanne V. Sterling Brown: Building the Black Aesthetic Tradition. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1985.

Heyward DuBose. "The Jazz Band's Sob"." New York Herald Tribune ( August 1, 1926): 4.

Hughes Langston. Ask Your Mama. New York: Knopf, 1961.

------. The Big Sea. New York: Knopf, 1940.

------. The Dream Keeper and Other Poems. New York: Knopf, 1932.

------. Famous Negro Music Makers. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1955.

------. Fields of Wonder. New York: Knopf, 1947.

------. Fine Clothes to the Jew. New York: Knopf, 1927.

-59-

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Jazz Poetry: From the 1920s to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Jazz Poetry: an Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • References 13
  • 2 - The Sin in Syncopation 15
  • Notes 36
  • References 38
  • 3 - Weary Blues, Harlem Galleries, and Southern Roads 41
  • Notes 57
  • References 59
  • 4 - From Obscurity to Fad: Jazz and Poetry in Performance 61
  • Notes 81
  • References 85
  • 5 - Chasin' the Bird: Charlie Parker and the Enraptured Poets of the Fifties 89
  • Notes 110
  • References 113
  • 6 - The John Coltrane Poem 115
  • Notes 136
  • References 140
  • 7 - Goodbye Porkpie Hat: Farewells and Remembrances 143
  • Notes 158
  • References 159
  • 8 - An Enormous Yes: Contemporary Jazz Poetry 163
  • Notes 180
  • References 181
  • Index 183
  • About the Author *
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