Jazz Poetry: From the 1920s to the Present

By Sascha Feinstein | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Bontemps Arna, and Langston Hughes. Arna Bontemps-Langston Hughes Letters 1925- 1967. Ed. Charles H. Nichols. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1980.

Brown Patrick James. "Jazz Poetry: Definition, Analysis, and Performance"." Diss. University of Southern California, 1978.

Brugmann Karl. Elements of the Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Germanic Languages. Trans. Joseph Wright. New York: Westermann, 1988.

Cerulli Dom, Burt Korall, and Mort Nasatir, eds. The Jazz Word. New York: Ballantine, 1960.

Cooper Don. Telephone interview. 6 Feb. 1993.

Creeley Robert. A Quick Graph: Collected Notes and Essays. San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1970.

-----. The Collected Poems of Robert Creeley. Berkeley: University of California, 1982.

-----. Contexts of Poetry: Interviews 1961- 1971. Ed. Donald Allen. Bolinas, Calif.: Four Seasons Foundation, 1973.

-----. "Ways of Looking". Poetry. 98 ( June 1961): 192-198.

Damon Maria. The Dark End of the Street. Margins in American Vanguard Poetry. Minneapolis: University of Minnisota, 1993.

Ford Kenneth. Poetry for Jazz. Carmel: Zocalo, 1959.

Giddins Gary. Celebrating Bird. The Triumph of Charlie Parker. New York: Beech Tree, 1987.

Hart Howard. Selected Poems: Six Sets, 1951- 1983. Berkeley, Calif.: City Miner, 1984.

Hartman Charles O. Jazz Text: Voice and Improvisation in Poetry, Jazz, and Song. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991.

Hughes Langston. Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz. New York: Knopf, 1961.

-----. Famous Negro Music Makers. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1955.

-----. The First Book of Jazz. New York: Franklin Watts, 1955.

-----. Montage of a Dream Deferred. New York: Henry Holt, 1951.

-----. Selected Poems. New York: Knopf, 1959.

Hughes Langston, and Arna Bontemps, eds. The Book of Negro Folklore. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1958.

Jemie Onwuchekwa. Langston Hughes: An Introduction to the Poetry. New York: Columbia University Press, 1965.

Kaufman Bob. The Ancient Rain: Poems 1956-1978. New York: New Directions, 1981.

-----. The Golden Sardine. San Francisco: City Lights, 1967.

-----. Solitudes Crowded with Loneliness. New York: New Directions, 1965.

Kennington Donald, and Danny L. Read. The Literature of Jazz: A Critical Guide. 2nd Ed., Rev. Chicago: American Library Association, 1980.

Kerouac Jack. Mexico City Blues. New York: Grove, 1959.

-----. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957.

-----. Poetry for the Beat Generation. With Steve Allen on piano. Rhino, R2 70939-A, 1990. (Originally released in 1959.)

-113-

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Jazz Poetry: From the 1920s to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Jazz Poetry: an Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • References 13
  • 2 - The Sin in Syncopation 15
  • Notes 36
  • References 38
  • 3 - Weary Blues, Harlem Galleries, and Southern Roads 41
  • Notes 57
  • References 59
  • 4 - From Obscurity to Fad: Jazz and Poetry in Performance 61
  • Notes 81
  • References 85
  • 5 - Chasin' the Bird: Charlie Parker and the Enraptured Poets of the Fifties 89
  • Notes 110
  • References 113
  • 6 - The John Coltrane Poem 115
  • Notes 136
  • References 140
  • 7 - Goodbye Porkpie Hat: Farewells and Remembrances 143
  • Notes 158
  • References 159
  • 8 - An Enormous Yes: Contemporary Jazz Poetry 163
  • Notes 180
  • References 181
  • Index 183
  • About the Author *
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