Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress

By Carol Armbruster | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

CAROL ARMBRUSTER is French/Italian area specialist in the European Division at the Library of Congress. She writes primarily on Western European publishing and research trends as they relate to American libraries and American information and research interests.

ROGER CHARTIER is a director of studies at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales. His publications include Lectures et lecteurs dans la France d'Ancien Régime ( 1987; Trans. The Cultural Uses of Print in Early Modern France, 1987); Les Usages de l'imprimé (XVe-XIXe siècle) ( 1987; Trans. The Culture of Print: Power and the Uses of Print in Early Modern Europe, 1989); Les Origines culturelles de la Révolution française ( 1990; Trans. The Cultural Origins of the French Revolution, 1991), and the 4-volume Histoire de l'édition française, co-editor with Henri-Jean Martin ( 1983- 1986).

ROBERT DARNTON is Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of European History at Princeton University. His publications include The Business of Enlightenment: a Publishing History of the Encyclopédie, 1775-1800 ( 1979), The Literary Underground of the Old Regime ( 1982), Revolution in Print: the Press in France, 1775-1800, co-editor with Daniel Roche ( 1989), Révolution et séduction: l'univers de la littérature clandestine ( 1991).

JAMES GILREATH is American History Specialist in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division at the Library of Congress. His publications include Federal Copyright Records, 1790-1800, introduction ( 1987); Thomas Jefferson's Library: A Catalog with the Entries in His Original Order, coauthor with Douglas Wilson 1989); and The Judgment of Experts: Essays and Documents about the Forging of the Oath of a Freeman, editor ( 1991).

JANE C. GINSBURG is Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at Columbia University School of Law. She is a co-author of two law school casebooks, Copyright for the Nineties and Trademark and Unfair Competition Law, and has published many articles on French and American copyright issues. She is a member of the editorial or advisory boards of the Columbia-VLA Journal of Law and the Arts, the Revue du droit de la propriété intellectuelle ( Paris) and the Entertainment Law Review

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Publishing and Readership in Revolutionary France and America: A Symposium at the Library of Congress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Publishing as a Profession *
  • Publishing and the Law 59
  • The Dilemmas of Republican Publishing, 1793-1799 61
  • Reading 115
  • Male and Female: Words and Images in the French Revolution 137
  • Publication and the Public Sphere 167
  • Collecting and Using Materials 175
  • Some Eighteenth-Century American Book Collectors, Their Collections, and Their Legacies 191
  • Select Bibliography 205
  • About the Contributors 207
  • Index 211
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