From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal

By Roger Hilsman | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
For a full account of the Cuban missile crisis, see Roger Hilsman, The Cuban Missile Crisis: The Struggle Over Policy ( Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1996), from which this chapter was drawn.
2
What is referred to here as an MRBM was designated by American intelligence as the SS-4 (the SS stands for surface-to-surface), a single-stage rocket. Without the nose cone, which is how it was normally transported, it was fifty-nine feet long. What is referred to here as an IRBM was designated by American intelligence as the SS-5, also a single-stage rocket. Without its nose cone it was eighty-two feet long and eight feet in diameter.
3
The United States believed at the time that the Soviet ground forces in Cuba numbered only about 20 thousand men and did not learn the true total was about 42 thousand until years after the crisis had been resolved. But low-level reconnaissance flights instituted on October 23, just after the crisis became public, over the next two or three days identified fourteen of the battlefield nuclear missile launchers, the weapon that the Soviets called the Luna and American intelligence called the Frog.
4
In the conference between Americans, Soviets, and Cubans on the crisis held in Havana in 1992, a Soviet general said that at this time some of the MRBM warheads were still en route, but that thirty-six had already arrived in Cuba (i.e., that thirty-six MRBMs were ready to fire, not twenty-four).
5
"Strangelove" was the name given by the American participants in the crisis after the movie, Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. In this movie, the world is destroyed in a nuclear war caused when a single plane, whose radio had been knocked out by antiaircraft fire, did not get the message to turn back and dropped a nuclear bomb on the Soviet Union, which in turn set off an American "doomsday" machine of nuclear missiles that were triggered automatically by a nuclear explosion anywhere in the world.
6
This U-2 incident was important in bringing about the establishment of the socalled "hot line," providing a round-the-clock communications link between Moscow and Washington, that was established after the crisis.
7
McGeorge Bundy, Danger and Survival: Choices About the Bomb in the First Fifty Years ( New York: Random House, 1988), 412.
8
Robert E Kennedy, Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1971), 45.

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.