From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal

By Roger Hilsman | Go to book overview
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NOTES
1
This section is based on the analysis in Roger Hilsman, The Crouching Future ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1975).
2
L. B. Namier, Conflicts: Studies in Contemporary History ( London: 1942), 70.
3
Charles Seignobos, The Evolution of the French People, trans. Catherine Alison Philips ( New York: 1932), 153.
4
Hans Kohn, The Idea of Nationalism: A Study of Its Origins and Background ( New York: 1948); C. H. Van Tyne, The War of Independence. American Phase ( Boston: 1929), 271.
5
Louis L. Snyder, The Dynamics of Nationalism ( Princeton: 1964), 2.
6
Carlton J. H. Hayes, Nationalism: A Religion ( New York: 1960), 3-4.
7
Rupert Emerson, From Empire to Nation: The Rise and Self-Assertion ofAsian and African Peoples ( Boston: 1960), 103.
8
Dankwart A. Rustow, A World of Nations: Problems of Political Modernization ( Washington, D.C.: 1967), 23.
9
Kohn, Idea of Nationalism, 14.
10
Boyd C. Shafer, Nationalism: Myth and Reality ( New York: 1955), 54.
11
Bernard Lewis, The Emergence of Modern Turkey ( London: 1961), 353.
12
Emerson, From Empire to Nation, 138.
15
On this point, see Rustow, World of Nations, 67.
16
Kohn, Idea of Nationalism, 19.
17
Sir Ivor Jennings, The Approach to Self-Government ( Cambridge: 1956), 56.
18
Ernest Renan, Qu'est-ce qu'une nation? trans. Ida Mae Snyder, in The Dynamics of Nationalism ( Princeton: 1964).
19
Karl W. Deutsch, Nationalism and Social Communication: An Inquiry into the Foundations of Nationality ( New York: 1953).
20
Kohn, Idea of Nationalism, 3.
21
Rustow, World of Nations, 2. See also Rustow on modernization, ibid., 3.
22
Emerson, From Empire to Nation, 190.
23
Lord Acton, "Nationality", in The History of Freedom and Other Essays ( London: 1909),292.
24
"The rise of Switzerland from the thirteenth century on," Deutsch writes, "was related to the changes in the technology of transport and bridge building which made the St. Gotthard Pass crucial in world trade and furnished the economic base for an independent 'pass state' in that region." Deutsch, Nationalism and Social Communication, 16.
27
Karl Deutsch, et al., Political Community and the North Atlantic Area: International Organization in the Light of Historical Experience ( Princeton: 1957), 23.
28
Emerson, From Empire to Nation, 96.
29
Deutsch, Nationalism and Social Communication, 85.
31
Personal communication.

-210-

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