From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal

By Roger Hilsman | Go to book overview

port to take these forces to where they are needed, and the air and sea power to support them when they get there.

The ground forces needed are a total of eight divisions: one armored, two mechanized, one air assault, and one airborne division in the Army, and three Marine divisions to perform the tasks of light divisions. For the Air Force the current force structure seems right, except that there is a very real need for an intercontinental cargo plane, like the C-17, that can land on small, austere airfields near the battle zone. If the problems of the G-17s are too great to be fixed, a completely new long-range cargo plane must be designed and built. For the Navy the total number carrier groups, each consisting of an aircraft carrier and its supporting ships, can be reduced from eleven to nine. However, to support the Rapid Deployment Force properly, the Navy may well have to add more roll-on, roll-off fast sealift squadrons. Finally, both the Air Force and the Navy should be equipped, as current planning provides, with an ample supply of the newer cruise missiles with highly accurate guidance systems. 8


NOTES
1
The New York Times, 18 Feb ruary 1997, p. A19.
2
For an expansion of this argument, see Roger Hilsman, "The U.S. Base Agreement with the Philippines," ADA Today 44, no. 3 ( 1989).
3
The Military Balance ( London: International Institute for Strategic Studies, 1997 1998).
5
Ibid.
6
For a rundown on the estimates of Iraqi military and civilian casualties, see Roger Hilsman , George Bush vs. Saddam Hussein: Military Success! Political Failure? ( Novato, Calif.: Presidio Press, 1992), 205-209, 219, 223-225.
7
U.S. Army Cost and Economic Analysis Center, in response to a specific request.
8
In response to complaints about military readiness, Clinton proposed to increase the military budget by $12 billion in the coming fiscal year and more than $100 billion over the next six years. Of this $12 billion, $2.5 billion would go for raises and retirement benefits, $2 billion would go for the force in Bosnia, and $7 billion would go for maintenance, spare parts, and so on. The $100 billion would pay for "modernization." However, it is anyone's guess how much of this the Congress will actually appropriate.

-290-

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From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xiv
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Part I - The First Attempts at Nuclear Strategy 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Manhattan Project and Early Strategic Thinking 3
  • Notes 14
  • Chapter 2 - Nuclear Strategy and the Attack on Korea 16
  • Notes 27
  • Chapter 3 - New Look, Massive Retaliation, and Flexible Response 28
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter 4 - The H-Bomb and the Balance of Terror 40
  • Notes 47
  • Chapter 5 - The Debate on Nuclear Strategy 49
  • Notes 55
  • Part II - The Cuban Missile Crisis: A Case Study of Nuclear Strategy 57
  • Chpter 6 - The Crisis 59
  • Notes 70
  • Chapter 7 - The Significance 71
  • Note 77
  • Chapter 8 - McNamara II, the Schlesinger Doctrine, and Star Wars 81
  • Notes 94
  • Chapter 9 - No First Use, Counterforce, and Mad as a Strategy 95
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 10 - The Breakup of the Soviet Union and the Bush -- Yeltsin Agreement 105
  • Notes 113
  • Part IV - The World Turned Upside Down 115
  • A Chapter 11 - Developments in Weapons 117
  • Notes 122
  • Chapter 12 - The Members of the Nuclear Club and Their Arms 123
  • Notes 138
  • Chapter 13 - Soviet, Chinese, and European Nuclear Strategy 139
  • Notes 147
  • Chapter 14 - Armageddon: Six Scenarios of Nuclear War 148
  • Notes 163
  • Part V - Arms Control and Disarmament 165
  • Chapter 15 - The History of Arms Control 167
  • Notes 179
  • Chapter 16 - The Prospects for Arms Control 180
  • Notes 186
  • Part VI - Why War? 187
  • Chapter 17 - The Social and Political Functions of War 189
  • Chapter 18 - Nationalism 198
  • Notes 210
  • Chapter 19 - A World Political Process Without World Government? 211
  • Notes 225
  • Chapter 20 - A Curious Creature 227
  • Notes 230
  • Part VII - Conclusions 231
  • Chapter 21 - A Long-Term Solution, a Medium-Term Compromise, and a Short-Term Stopgap 233
  • Chapter 22 - The Lessons of the "Small Wars" Since World War II 238
  • Notes 256
  • Chapter 23 - Humanitarian and Peacekeeping Forces 259
  • Notes 274
  • Chapter 24 - Conventional Forces for the Medium-Term Compromise 278
  • Notes 290
  • Chapter 25 - Nuclear Forces for the Short- Term Stopgap 291
  • Notes 304
  • Index 305
  • About the Author *
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